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Sydney Airport : 2019 Sydney Airport Sustainability Report

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02/19/2020 | 06:47pm EDT

Sustainability Report 2019

Contents

We're growing with our changing world

Sydney Airport|  Sustainability Report 2019

Sustainability at Sydney Airport

1.

Responsible business

2.

Planning for the future

3.

Supporting our community

4.

Performance data

5.

Other information

  1. Chair and CEO message
  1. Performance highlights
  1. Our approach to sustainability
  1. 2019-2021Sustainability commitments
  1. Material issues
  1. Stakeholder engagement
  1. Benchmark and ratings performance
  1. Safety
  1. Security
  1. Operational efficiency and continuous improvement
  1. Environmental management
  1. Our people
  1. Fair and ethical business

31 Climate resilience

  1. Sustainable development of the airport
  1. Airspace and airfield efficiency
  1. TCFD disclosure
  1. Customer experience
  1. Access to and from the airport
  2. Innovation and technology
  1. Community engagement
  2. Community investment
  1. Reconciliation Action Plan
  1. Aircraft noise
  2. Airport community
  3. Scope 3 emissions reduction
  1. Economic contribution
  1. General metrics
  1. Health and safety
  2. Environment
  3. Customer
  4. People and organisation
  5. Community investment
  1. GRI index
  1. Glossary
  2. Limited assurance statement
  1. Photo credits

About this report

This 2019 Sustainability Report covers Sydney Airport's operations for the year 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019, except for environmental data sets which are reported for 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019, in line with Sydney Airport's regulatory environmental reporting. All financial values are in Australian dollars. This report is prepared in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative Standards: Core option and the UN Sustainable Development Goals guide

our reporting of relevant global issues. The Management Approach for each our material issues can be found at www.sydneyairport.com.au/corporate/ sustainability. To provide confidence in our reporting, we engaged KPMG to provide limited assurance over selected data sets within our 2019 Sustainability Report. KPMG's assurance statement is included at the end of this report.

We welcome feedback on our sustainability reporting and performance. Please email us at sustainability@syd.com.au.

sydneyairport.com.au 01

Chair and CEO message

We are Sydney's Airport and we want to make you proud every day

In 2019 we made the decision to change our company purpose statement to one that guides our thinking and decision making and sets an aspirational goal that we can all rally around. Our new purpose is "to make Sydney proud every day" and we apply it to everything we do every day, including sustainability.

We're proud of our sustainability achievements to date. Sydney Airport was the first airport in Australia to report publicly on our sustainability performance and we have continued to build on this foundation of transparency and accountability. Our commitment to further embedding sustainability into all our decision making will ensure we remain a leader in this space.

Having said that, there is more we can, and need, to do. As the global demand for travel continues to grow, so does the focus on sustainable aviation. Airports have an important role in this transition. We have an opportunity to show real leadership on social and environmental issues and to set the standards to which other industries aspire.

This report is one of the ways we share our performance with our stakeholders and build confidence and trust in our ability to deliver on our commitments.

1 Australian Bureau of Statistics, June 2018

It provides an update on progress we have made in the first year of our three-year sustainability strategy and sets out our goals for the future. Our sustainability strategy is built around three pillars: responsible business, planning for the future and supporting our communities.

Responsible business

We recognise the importance of operating and growing our airport responsibly, making it a safe place for workers and passengers while minimising and managing the environmental impact of our activities.

We took a number of important steps this year to enhance the safety culture within our organisation and across the airport community. A key initiative has been the instigation of quarterly safety walks, which are designed to raise awareness of hazards and recognise safe work practices around the airport. Safety walks have been embraced by our

people with 840 completed during the year. The number of employee lost time injuries fell from 10 to five, a reflection of the renewed focus on safety across the organisation.

In 2019 we were particularly proud of our award-winning A$1.4 billion Sustainability Linked Loan, which links our cost of capital to our performance on a range of sustainability metrics. This world leading loan shows that we're prepared to put our money where our mouth is, and we encourage you to read more about this landmark transaction in this report.

Our work to reduce our carbon footprint saw carbon intensity per passenger improve to its lowest level in 10 years of measurement and our absolute CO2 emissions reduce by four per cent. Output from our onsite rooftop solar generation more than doubled in the first full year of its operation, and our work with retailers across our terminals

02 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Trevor Gerber

Chairman

Geoff Culbert

Chief Executive Officer

Sydney at Sustainability

saw us achieve our threeyear target to remove single use plastic bags and straws from our terminals

in just one year.

Our innovative approach to sustainability is being recognised in Australia and around the world. This year, we moved up to third in Sustainalytics' global airports subindustry sector. We were again rated 'AAA' by MSCI and ranked in the 90th percentile in our industry group on the DJSI. We continued to support and align our efforts with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the Principles of the UN Global Compact.

We were also proud to support an Australian-first campaign to raise awareness of forced marriage in partnership with the Australian Federal Police and Anti-Slavery Australia and joined the United for Wildlife Transport Taskforce in the fight against illegal wildlife trafficking.

Planning for the future

We take a long-term approach to managing our airport and recognise the role business plays in addressing the global climate challenge.

Sydney Airport provides essential regional and national infrastructure and we are committed to improving our resilience to a changing climate. This year, we expanded our scenario analysis and reviewed and updated our Climate Risk and Adaptation Plan to consider key risks and opportunities associated with the transition to a low carbon economy. We also strengthened our disclosure in line with the Taskforce on Climate Related Disclosures (TCFD) recommendations in both our Annual Report and this report.

We're building our airport for the future and our customers are at the heart of all that we do. Our customer experience scores reached their highest levels this year, which reflects our commitment to our customers to improve their airport experience.

Accessibility to and from the airport remained a priority focus area for us. We initiated changes to traffic flows within the domestic and international terminal precincts that delivered significant improvements during peak periods. Importantly, the NSW Government's Sydney Gateway project progressed well which, once complete, will provide a faster connection

to the airport.

To improve accessibility within our terminals, a new partnership with Aira was formed which helps blind and low vision travellers navigate the airport. This partnership was recognised by the Australian Airport Association with the 2019 Customer Experience Award.

This year, we continued to deliver on key elements of our Master Plan

2039. The construction of additional aprons and taxiways began as well as baggage and freight facilities which will enhance capacity, efficiency and operational resilience.

Our focus on innovation continued as we explored opportunities associated with biometrics, which have the potential to improve our passenger experience. New technologies were trialled across the airport including an automated aerobridge docking system, which was a first for an Australian airport.

Supporting our communities

We're proud to be a part of the vibrant and exciting community that is Sydney. In our centenary year, we celebrated the history of our airport while continuing to build and foster strong links

with the community.

We were proud to invest $5.2 million in our communities during 2019 through community investment, sponsorships, donations and our people volunteering in the community.

To celebrate our centenary, we announced the new SYD100 scholarship program. This provides a scholarship every year for the next 100 years for a student to study in the fields of aviation and commerce at the University of New South Wales.

We have a proud 18-year partnership with Surf Life Saving Sydney. This year we provided more than $300,000 to help keep our beaches safe through our Centenary Partnership and Christmas Giving Appeal funds. Our annual

lost property auction raised a record $190,000, which was shared with nine community organisations.

The first projects funded under the Community and Environmental Projects Reserve Fund established with Bayside Council were announced this year.

We will contribute $1 million over five years to a new Green Bayside project to plant trees and $5 million to the upgrade of the Botany Aquatic Centre.

Looking forward

Through our strategic initiatives, we're committed to operating and developing our airport in a way that makes Sydney proud.

We are pleased with the progress we are making on our commitments and invite you to read on to learn more about our initiatives and performance throughout 2019.

We commend this report to you and welcome your feedback.

Trevor Gerber

Chairman

Geoff Culbert

Chief Executive Officer

Airport

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 03

Performance highlights

Delivering for the long term

34.5%

43.4%

$1.4b

reduction of emissions

waste

Sustainability

intensity (per pax)

recycling rate 2

Linked Loan

since 2010

from 42.9%

in 2018

$5.2m

840

95.9

in community

safety walks

gender pay equity ratio

investment

completed

from 93.4

in 2018

2 Excludes quarantine waste, which cannot be recycled due to quarantine restrictions and requirements

04 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

5

4.19/5

employee

overall customer

Lost Time Injuries

satisfaction rating

from 10

from 4.14

in 2010

in 2018

75%

30%

of current load contracted

via a renewable

water recycling

rate at T1

energy PPA

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 05

Our approach to sustainability

Responsible growth

Sustainability underpins our commitment to responsible growth in a way that delivers positive outcomes for our customers, investors and the communities in which we operate. It is integral to our business strategy and the delivery of our purpose: to make Sydney proud every day.

Our sustainability strategy responds to our changing world and to the challenges and opportunities that shape business in Australia and globally.

We recognise the important role our airport can play in addressing environmental and social challenges now and into the future. This was the first year of delivery under our refreshed sustainability strategy and three-year commitments. These commitments drive our activities towards our strategic focus areas, which create the most value for stakeholders.

We participate in global industry forums to represent our sustainability focus and draw from best practice globally and locally. Sydney Airport CEO Geoff Culbert sits on the Airports Council International (ACI) World Governing Board and Asia Pacific Regional Board, through which he is championing a global approach to climate for the aviation industry.

The Board's Safety, Security and Sustainability (SSS) Committee assists the Board to address its responsibilities. During 2019, we reviewed and updated the committee's Charter which continues to include climate change.

Our Sustainability Working Group and sustainability champions continued to support the operational delivery of our sustainability commitments.

This report provides a clear account of our performance against our strategy. We have presented the information under the three strategic themes: Responsible Business, Planning for the Future and, Supporting our Communities.

Contributing to the United Nations Sustainable

Development Goals

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) seek to address the most significant challenges our world is facing today. To play our role in addressing these challenges, we have mapped the SDG framework against our sustainability strategy.

Details on what contributing to the SDGs means in the context of our airport operations is referenced throughout this report and is available on our website.

Sydney Airport became a signatory to the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) in 2017 and is pleased to reaffirm its commitment to this initiative and its principles.

06 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Global trends

Evolution in our business context is taking many forms, from advancements in the aviation sector and technology disruption to climate change and changing consumer trends. Understanding and embracing change will shape our future and guide our strategic thinking.

Sustainable aviation fuels

Sustainable aviation fuel derived from non fossil fuel sources is widely recognised as the best short to medium term opportunity to reduce aviation emissions. International Air Transport Association (IATA) has set a goal for one billion passengers to fly on aircraft powered by sustainable aviation fuel blends by 2025. Government policies supporting increased production are considered key to achieving this goal.

We recognise the role sustainable aviation fuel can play in the aviation sector and the importance of our support for solutions, technologies and the infrastructure required to enable this transition. As an infrastructure provider we want to do our part to ensure there are no barriers to these fuels entering the market at Sydney Airport.

Digitisation and new technology

Digitisation and the rise of big data have the potential to transform the customer journey, optimise airport systems and personalise the travel experience.

Biometrics can provide passengers with a seamless travel experience with a single identification, which will radically improve processing times and optimise the use of the terminal. Autonomous vehicles will provide new transport options within and around airports, while innovations in technology such as commercialised drones also have the potential to change how airspace is used and shared.

We are committed to embracing innovation and technology to improve efficiencies and the customer experience, while maintaining aviation safety and security as priorities.

A shrinking world

With developments in ultra long-haul next generation aircraft technology almost 100 per cent of the world's population will be within reach of Sydney in a single flight. This improved access creates opportunities for economic growth and increased productivity, linked to the ability to move people and products around the globe.

A mobile global population

Sydney continues to be one of the world's most multicultural cities, attracting people from all over the globe.

In recent years, Sydney Airport has seen passenger growth from emerging markets such as Vietnam, India, China and the Philippines as well as from more mature markets like USA and Japan.

With an increasingly mobile global population, facilitated by increased accessibility of air travel, the reasons for travel continue to grow and change.

Our aviation business development team is focussed on ensuring we continue to connect the world to Sydney and Sydney to the world.

Travelling more sustainably

The number of international trips taken globally reached 1.4 billion in 2018, two years faster than original projections 3. Travellers are increasingly considering the impacts of their travel, whether it be transportation choices or concerns of overcrowding at popular tourism destinations.

We recognise that all parts of the travel industry need to focus on how to grow sustainably. We remain committed to ensuring we play a positive role in this shift.

3 UN World Tourism Barometer, January 2019

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 07

2019-2021 Sustainability commitments

Delivering on our commitments

Our 2019-2021 commitments embed sustainability in all aspects of our business in line with the pillars of our strategy. Our flagship initiatives support these pillars and focus attention on issues where we can drive a step change in our performance.

Responsible business

Being ethically responsible and transparent in how we do business

Safety and wellbeing of all airport users

Achieve year-on-year improvement in injury statistics and aviation safety performance

Increase uptake and awareness around wellbeing and mental health

Continuing to support a diverse and inclusive workplace

Achieve a 10 per cent uplift in female representation in management and overall on 2018 performance

Achieve 30 per cent female board representation

Looking after and developing our people

Target an employee engagement score of at least 75 per cent

Deliver 1.5 days of training per employee per annum

Building operational resilience

Deliver employee incident and crisis management training

Achieve a cyber security maturity target of four out of five

Operating ethically and with integrity

Complete supplier questionnaire to assess and mitigate risks on biennial basis

Align procurement policy with ISO 20400

Maintaining an environmentally responsible airport

Continue to meet regulatory compliance requirements for noise and air quality

Reduce potable water use per passenger by 10 per cent in terminals and commercial buildings

Maintain 30 per cent average annual use of recycled water at T1

Reducing waste to landfill

Remove plastic straws and single-use plastic bags from our terminals

Recycle landside organic waste at T1

Protecting local natural areas and biodiversity

Restore and rehabilitate Environmental Conservation 1 zones, predominantly consisting of the Sydney Airport Wetlands

 Achieved  Significant progress  In progress  Not achieved

08 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Planning for the future

Delivering operational excellence through innovative, technology-based solutions and supporting customer needs now and into the future

Increasing and supporting landside efficiency

Support diversity of public transport modal options

Delivering better outcomes for our customers

Maintain a passenger satisfaction score above four out of five

Sustainable development of the airport

Achieve a minimum 4-Star Green Star Design and AsBuilt rating for new developments

Supporting our communities

Working with communities to create shared value

Building relationships and supporting community resilience

Establish a baseline for community investment

Develop a community investment strategy to drive continuous improvement

Work with business partners to deliver a pilot program towards prevention of human trafficking and slavery

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

Flagship initiatives

Climate resilience

Airspace and airfield efficiency

Follow the recommendations of the Task Force on

Deliver an Airport Collaborative Decision Making

Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD)

(A-CDM) program together with business partners

Achieve carbon neutrality by 2025

Improve airfield and aviation support infrastructure

Reduce carbon emissions per passenger by

Explore opportunities to further improve efficiencies

50 per cent from 2010 baseline levels by 2025

through initiatives such as co-location of certain

Electrification

domestic and international activities and

runway rebalancing

100 per cent electric landside bus fleet

Install Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations in

new landside facilities five per cent above EV

market penetration

Increase aircraft utilisation of both fixed ground

power and pre-conditioned air at T1 from 20 per cent

to above 50 per cent

Facilitate and support increase of Sydney Airport

airside electric vehicle usage to 50 per cent

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 09

Material issues

Focusing on the issues that matter

Each year, we review a range of current and emerging issues that may impact our stakeholders and our business with consideration of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Reporting Principles.

To determine our material issues, we reached out to our customers, government representatives, suppliers, employees,

airport business partners, analysts, investors and representatives of tourism bodies. We asked them to tell us which issues matter most to them. This report details our performance in relation to the issues considered to be material to our business.

During 2019, we updated our list of material issues within the context of global trends, the United Nations SDGs and our business strategy. This resulted in some changes to the material issues discussed in the previous report:

'Economic performance' and 'Innovation and technology' were added as new issues

'Human rights' and 'Sustainable procurement' are now included in 'Fair and ethical business operations'

'Capacity' is included in 'Sustainable development of the airport'

10 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Strategic pillar

Responsible

Planning for

Supporting our

Material issue

Definition

business

the future

communities

Access to and

Ensuring our passengers have a safe and efficient journey

from the airport

to and from the airport, and that a range of transport modes

are available to suit their preferences

Aircraft noise

Working with government and airline partners to manage

and mitigate noise impacts

Business continuity

Designing and maintaining our facilities to ensure continuity

and performance

of operations under a range of different circumstances,

for example increased competition or greater regulation

Climate change

Building resilience to the physical and strategic risks

associated with climate change, and taking action to reduce

our impacts including through our energy use

Community

Playing a meaningful role in our local community,

investment and

while building and maintaining enduring

engagement

relationships based on trust

Customer

Providing a superior customer experience for

experience

airlines and passengers

Cyber security

Prepare, prevent and respond to cyber attacks that could

impact our operations and those of our customers

Diversity and

Creating and managing a diverse and inclusive workforce,

inclusion

and contributing to the creation of an inclusive society

Economic

The creation and distribution of economic value

performance

Employee

Attracting, retaining and developing the best people to

attraction, retention

ensure the success of our business

and development

Environmental

Operating an environmentally responsible airport, actively

management

managing the use of resources and minimising waste,

protecting the local natural environment and managing

impacts on the surrounding community

Fair and ethical

Respecting and protecting human rights across all

business

aspects of our operations. Maintaining an effective

system of corporate governance and building a culture to

maintain high ethical standards and integrity. Responsible

management of our supply chain, working with suppliers

to effectively manage environmental, social and

governance risks

Innovation and

Embracing future trends to create new opportunities

technology

Operational

Operating the airport efficiently to support customers,

efficiency and

environmental outcomes and On Time Performance,

continuous

while looking for ways to improve

improvement

Safety

Managing health and safety risks and maintaining a strong

safety culture, while providing a work environment that

protects the health and wellbeing of our people and people

working at the airport

Security

Working collaboratively with airport stakeholders

to provide and maintain a safe and secure airport

operating environment

Sustainable

Sustainably developing the airport to meet passenger

development of

growth through collaborative decision making,

the airport

efficiency improvements, sustainable infrastructure

design and strategic planning

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 11

Stakeholder engagement

Listening to you

Fostering positive, strong, lasting relationships with all those who might be affected by the decisions and activities concerning the airport's development and operation is a priority for us,

and we acknowledge that this is vital to our long term success. We recognise that each of our stakeholders has different interests, expectations and interactions with the airport.

12 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

How we engage

Key areas of interest

- Annual General Meeting

- Economic and financial performance

- Roadshows, meetings and conferences

- Fair and ethical operations

Analysts and

- ASX releases

- Climate resilience

- Investor days, presentations and briefings

- Operational efficiency and

investors

- Analyst surveys

continuous improvement

- Website

- Safety and security

- ESG performance

- Committees and forums

- Safety and security

- Briefings and meetings

- Customer experience

- Relationship managers

- Operational efficiency and

Business partners

- Service requests

continuous improvement

- InfoSyd website

- Business continuity and resilience

- Service quality and value

- Whistleblower policy

- Satisfaction surveys

- Customer experience

Customers

- Feedback channels and service requests

- Airport access

- Media and advertising

- Safety and security

- Competitions

- Operational efficiency and service quality

- Relationship managers

- Engagement surveys

- Safety and security

- Employee committees and working groups

- Sustainable development

- Yammer (internal social media)

- Growth and development

Employees

- People leader forums

- Health and wellbeing

- CEO newsletters and all staff briefings

- Diversity

- Intranet

- Fair and ethical operations

- Financial performance

- Whistleblower policy

- Briefings and meetings

- Safety and security

- Industry forums

- Climate change

Government and

- Submissions

- Airport access

- Industry working groups

- Operational efficiency and

regulators

continuous improvement

- Environmental management

- Sustainable development

- Community forums

- Safety

- Council briefings

- Economic and financial performance

Local community

- Sentiment surveys

- Airport access - roads and public transport

- Partnerships with community organisations

- Noise and environmental management

- Media and advertising

- Community investment

- Jobs for locals

- Supplier forums

- Safety and security

Suppliers

- Meetings

- Business continuity and resilience

- Assessment against our

- Customer experience

Supplier Code of Conduct

- Fair and ethical operations

- Whistleblower policy

- Meetings

- Security

Tourism bodies

- Participation in events and conferences

- Economic and financial performance

and industry

- Industry forums

- Airport access

associations

- Customer experience

- Sustainable development

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 13

Benchmark and ratings performance

Benchmarking our performance

We benchmark our progress against a number of leading sustainability indices and frameworks to drive better performance in environmental, social and governance issues.

This year we improved our Sustainalytics ranking from 4th to 3rd globally and maintained our performance on other indices against which we benchmark ourselves.

Ratings4

Ranked in the

90th

percentile globally in DJSI's Transport and Transportation Infrastructure sector

for Master Plan 2039, the first for an airport

Index Series

Membership

reflecting our strong ESG management practices

4 As at date of publication

Ranked

3rd

globally in the Airports sub industry group

Level 3 'Optimisation'

Airport Carbon

Accreditation

5

'Industry Leader' rating, and sitting in the top 20 per cent for the infrastructure industry

'AAA' rating

sitting in the top nine per cent of companies globally within the infrastructure sector, and a member of the MSCI Australia ESG Leaders Index

14 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Recognition

ACSI

'Leading' rating

for our Sustainability Report by the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors

2019 Customer

Experience Award

Sustainability Linked Loan

Green/SRI Loan of the Year and Most impressive Green/ SRI Loan Borrower

Finance Asia

Issuer of the Year - Sustainability

Syndicated Loan

Deal of the Year

Frameworks

GRI

This report has been prepared in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative Standards: Core option

Supporter of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures and commitment to move towards alignment with its recommendations

Participant in the United Nations Global Compact and commitment to implementing the 10 principles

Track and measure community investments in line with the framework developed by London Benchmarking Group

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 15

Responsible business

We strive to be ethically responsible and transparent in how we do business

43.4%

5

0

waste recycling

employee LTIs,

class 1

rate 5

down from 10 in 2018

injuries

39%

95.9

30%

women in our

gender pay

water recycling

workforce

equity ratio

rate at T1

5 Excludes quarantine waste, which cannot be recycled due to quarantine restrictions and requirements

16 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Sustainability Linked Loan

Our Sustainability Linked Loan (SLL), the first syndicated SLL in Australia, largest syndicated SLL across the Asia Pacific and largest syndicated airport SLL globally, is a clear example of innovation.

The $1.4 billion loan establishes a direct two-way link between our sustainability performance and funding costs, where rates decrease or increase depending on our sustainability performance over time as measured by Sustainalytics, a leading specialist investment research and ratings provider dedicated to ESG globally. The loan provides a significant incentive for us to embed sustainability within our business and deliver on our sustainability commitments.

We were proud to be recognised by GlobalCapital as the Most Impressive Green/SRI Borrower of the Year and Green/SRI Loan of the Year. Sydney Airport was also named Issuer of the Year - Sustainability by FinanceAsia and the SLL as Syndicated Loan Deal of the Year by KangaNews.

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

Safety

The safety and security of all our passengers,

visitors and staff is our first priority.

Safety is a responsibility for us all at Sydney Airport

Supporting

operations. Our Safety Policy sets out our objectives while

and across our airport community. We are committed

to ensuring the highest levels of safety across our

our safety management system provides the framework

our

for managing risk in our operations. More information

community

about our management approach to safety can be found

on our website.

Improving safety performance

This year, we updated our safety strategy to further

develop our safety culture and build on safety systems to

enhance risk management.

We are focussed on driving a culture that supports a

Performance

reduce from 10 in 2018 to five over more than

reduction in injuries.

Pleasingly, we saw the number of Lost Time Injuries

931,675 hours worked by Sydney Airport staff in 2019

data

across the airport. This was the result of a reduction in

low-riskhigh-frequency incidents in the corporate areas

of the business.

We saw an increase in the Lost Time Injuries of our service

providers 6, up to 13 from nine in 2018. Over the coming

year, we will continue to work with our service providers to

Other

further improve their safety performance.

trolleys and bussing

information

6 Service providers engaged by Sydney Airport include cleaning,

security, kerb side management, waste management, parking and

sydneyairport.com.au

17

Responsible business

Strengthening our safety culture

Our diverse safety risk profile means that a strong safety culture is one of the ways we can ensure everyone works safely and goes home safe and well.

This year, we have further strengthened the safety culture across our team and the airport community.

We launched SYD Safety Rules during Airport Safety Week, confirming 13 rules that are based on safe behaviours for the airport community.

Critical Risk Standards were developed in 2019 in consultation with stakeholders. These focus on a number of critical safety risks primarily related to maintenance and construction work across the airport. They will be implemented during 2020.

New safety KPIs for people leaders introduced in 2018 led to a stronger safety culture across the organisation, with more than 90 per cent of our people leaders completing four safety walks each in 2019 - exceeding

our target. There were no class 17 injuries or illnesses.

Passenger safety

Passenger safety and first aid continues to be a focus in the terminals and across our workplaces due to the volume of passengers we serve. Our dedicated terminal services teams are often

the first responders in situations where passengers require emergency medical assistance.

Our passenger incident rate dropped from 1.03 in 2018 to 0.9 in 2019, with medical incidents being the most frequent passenger incident, followed by slips, trips and falls. Analysis of these events has led to improved wayfinding and emergency stop and assistance signage at escalators. We also began stocking EpiPens in first aid kits to ensure a quick response is possible in the event of an allergic reaction.

Mental health and wellbeing

Our focus on mental health and wellbeing across our airport community continued this year.

We again supported RU OK? Day, hosting sessions for people working at the airport that sought to reduce the stigma often associated with mental illness in the workplace. We continued to offer free yoga classes for our people before

work and during lunchtimes and held a number of lunch and learn sessions for our people addressing mental health.

To further strengthen the focus on health, safety and wellbeing, a revised Fatigue Management Policy and assessment process was introduced, with particular focus on shift workers.

We strengthened the mental health expertise in our business by adding a new mental health specialist to our safety team. In 2020, a mental health strategy will be developed. Our objective is to build better mental health for

our people by promoting wellbeing, supporting mental ill-health conditions and protecting the mental health of staff. We will undertake a psychosocial risk assessment to better understand the risks which exist across our business and our workforce. We will also build

a mental health champions program and work to develop mental health capabilities in our people leaders.

7 A class 1 injury or illness is one which results in a fatality, total permanent disability or permanent partial disability

18 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Aviation safety

One of the most serious risks to aviation safety is Foreign Object Debris (FOD), which can make its way on to the runway and pose a risk to the safe operation

of the aircraft. Our FOD management program is designed to minimise this risk and actively manage FOD on the airfield.

We use statistical analysis and spatial mapping to examine the types and locations of FOD on the airfield.

In addition to our sweeper and spill response trucks, this year we introduced two additional FOD walkers on the international aprons to gather small items that accumulate during the day. We also created a sub-committee of our Aviation Safety Committee to bring together ground handlers, airlines and airport staff to specifically look at

FOD management.

Another risk to aviation safety is equipment on the airfield that isn't properly stored. This year we built a new Unit Load Device (ULD) storage area to better organise ULDs on the airfield and protect them from damage.

Wildlife in and around the airfield can also pose a safety risk and may cause damage to aircraft. We do everything we can to divert wildlife from making the airfield their permanent home. We also actively manage those animals whose natural habitat is the airport precinct. The airfield team constantly monitors the aerodrome to ensure birds are

not jeopardising the safety of aircraft operations and use a range of strategies to disperse birds primarily through noise, including pyrotechnics and sirens. This year, there were 2.3 wildlife strikes per 10,000 aircraft movements,

an increase on 2018.

SYD Safety Rules

Hazard Control

Prioritise safety at all times

Energy Isolation

Verify isolation and zero energy before work begins

Hot Work

Control flammables and ignition sources

Safe Mechanical Lifting

Plan lifting operations and control the area

Working at Height

Protect yourself against a fall when working at height

Line of Fire

Keep yourself and others out of the line of fire

Fit for Work

Be in a state to perform work safely

Manual Handling

Look after your body and perform tasks safely

Foreign Object Debris

FOD is everybody's responsibility

Safety Controls

Obtaining authorisation before overriding or disabling safety controls

Safety Behaviours

Lead by example

Confined Space

Obtain authorisation before entering a confined space

Driving

Follow safe driving rules

sydneyairport.com.au

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Security

We continued to work with the Australian Government and border agencies

to respond to emerging risks in the security environment.

In late 2019 we assumed security screening responsibilities for T3,

the Qantas seamless transfer area and Qantas Lounge delivery dock as part of the T3 transition from Qantas to Sydney Airport. This is in addition to our screening responsibilities at T1 and T2.

We completed a CT Scanning trial for checked and carry-on baggage as we progressively roll out new equipment to meet government-mandated security requirements. The trial achieved improved security outcomes and enabled increased throughput delivering a faster, more seamless customer experience. Further work on the progressive implementation of new security requirements will continue in 2020.

We also completed the introduction of random and unpredictable screening on entry to the security restricted area. Multiple teams are now conducting screening of pedestrian and vehicle entry points using explosive trace detection, hand-held metal detectors and physical searches.

In September, we supported the Australian Defence Force (ADF) to run a simulated counter-terrorism training activity at Sydney Airport, providing a realistic urban training environment. This was part of the ADF's regular training program to ensure it has the highest level of capability to protect Australia's national interests and provide assistance in civil emergencies.

Managing drones

Remotely piloted aircraft systems, or drones, are increasingly common around the world. Uncontrolled, drones can pose significant risks to aviation safety.

Drone activity in Australia is regulated by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA). As Sydney Airport is a controlled aerodrome, drone activity is prohibited in areas within three nautical miles (5.5 km) under these regulations.

During the year we met with representatives from State and local government and other stakeholders to raise awareness of the aviation safety risks associated with drones and to encourage clear and prominent signage prohibiting drone activity within these areas. We will continue to work with councils to place CASA approved signage within open spaces around the airport.

Cyber security

As the security threat landscape evolves we remain focused on managing current and emerging cyber risks. We constantly monitor the threat environment and are continuing to build our resilience.

Our cyber security program is supported by our Information Security Management System (ISMS) and our Incident Action Plan (IAP). These are collectively designed to protect our IT infrastructure and data from attack through a series of defence mechanisms, and support our response in the event of an incident.

We continue to invest in systems and processes to ward off growing cyber security threats and have strengthened our cyber security maturity rating by investing in the security awareness of our people. In 2019, we invested in staff phishing training, tests and awareness campaigns and implemented enhanced monitoring on critical systems. We also worked with external experts to benchmark our cyber maturity and align it with our ISO 27001 certification.

Operational efficiency and continuous improvement

This year, we continued to deliver upgrades across the airport.

We completed the T2 lifestyle precinct, delivering new commercial space and comfortable dwell areas for passengers.

At T1, we updated the Departures wall to provide an enhanced visitor experience and increased capacity to allow faster movement of passengers to border processing at peak times. We also refurbished the T1 baggage reclaim hall to provide an improved arrivals experience and increased efficiency. Our Pier C gate lounge expansion and upgrade of the Pier B concourse and lounges were also completed.

Baggage handling system upgrades

Baggage handling systems are critical to the smooth and continuous operation of our airport.

We progressed the replacement of the T1 Baggage Handling System (BHS) High Level Control (HLC) sortation software system. The HLC system is responsible for handling the accurate and on time sorting of bags. This upgrade will improve system and service resilience, which is critical to operational resilience. It will facilitate the automated routing of bags around areas experiencing congestion or equipment unavailability, reducing dependence on manual operational responsiveness.

It also creates a 3D view of the entire

T1 BHS with actual bag flows updated in real-time, allowing greater situational awareness and a better quality baggage service for our airline partners and passengers. The new system is expected to be operational in mid-2020.

We are also developing the T1 Southern bag room to provide additional capacity, and improve the redundancy and resilience of the system. This will enhance baggage security screening and introduce new automation to minimise manual handling and mishandled bags.

20 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Resilience

As a piece of critical national infrastructure, we need to ensure we are resilient and can continue to operate under a range of differing circumstances.

During the year, we continued to test our resilience with emergency exercises. We hosted multi-agency desktop exercises under a range of scenarios including the activation of the Emergency Operations Centre in a missing flight scenario, a drone activity response scenario and a health pandemic scenario on an inbound flight requiring quarantine. We also conducted a modular exercise to test the aerodrome secondary staging area and site control activation, and another for an active armed offender scenario on the airport precinct.

We revised and improved our crisis protocol and delivered refresher training in incident and crisis management to key personnel involved in responding to a crisis situation.

Upgrades to airfield infrastructure

During the year, both parallel runways were upgraded to enhance our ability to facilitate aircraft operations in low visibility conditions, including weather events such as fog. We estimate around 80 diversions from Sydney Airport were avoided following these upgrades, resulting in less inconvenience for customers and a large saving in fuel burn for aircraft.

Airport Operators Licence

We continued to progress the introduction of an Airport Operators Licence (AOL) this year, which will establish a direct relationship between the airport and ground service providers. Internationally, AOLs improve safety standards, infrastructure utilisation and accountability across the airfield.

The AOL will establish and enforce minimum standards to improve behaviours and enhance outcomes across safety, security, environment, operational and sustainability performance for companies operating on the airfield. This includes ground handling agents, aircraft refuelling

companies, cargo terminal operators, catering and cabin cleaning companies and aircraft maintenance providers, among others.

The draft licence documentation was issued for consultation during the year ahead of its implementation in 2020. Discussions were held to finalise the AOL terms including safety, environmental and operational standards and behaviours, and the associated enforcement process, as well as vehicle replacement and electrification requirements. We commenced the recruitment process for a Manager of Ground Operations Compliance, the first role in the Office of the AOL.

Through our commitment to operational resilience and efficiency, we contribute to developing quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure to support economic development.

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Environmental management 8

We are committed to continual improvement of environmental performance at the airport.

The strategic direction for environmental performance and management of Sydney Airport is set every five years

in our Airport Environment Strategy. Our current strategy was approved in early 2019 and covers the period between 2019 and 2024. It is available to download from our website.

We adopt a risk-based approach to environmental management. During the year, we refreshed and updated our Environmental Management System. We engaged an external auditor to assess its alignment with AS/NZ ISO 14001, which confirmed our EMS is consistent with the standard.

PFAS management

We are committed to communicating about how we are working with our tenants and other stakeholders to safely manage polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) contamination at the airport.

Our Master Plan 2039 and Environment Strategy 2019-2024 recognise that Sydney Airport has been impacted

by the use of PFAS by a number of third parties. The majority of PFAS on airport is attributed to the historical use of fire fighting foams by fire service providers, primarily Airservices Australia. PFAS containing product is currently used in the Qantas and JUHI fire fighting deluge systems.

Sydney Airport is committed to applying the 'precautionary principle' to protect human health and the environment in relation to PFAS. That means we have requested tenants to cease the use

of PFAS fire fighting foams on airport, are undertaking a detailed analysis of PFAS on airport and requiring polluters to develop plans for containment and remediation.

Our priority is to deliver the highest levels of safety for our people, contractors, passengers, community and stakeholders, and to ensure we operate sustainably by minimising impacts on our local environment.

A detailed overview of our approach to managing PFAS at Sydney Airport is available on our website.

Emissions management

We remain committed to reducing our emissions footprint and have set ourselves a target to achieve a

50 per cent reduction in emissions per passenger by 2025 9, and to achieve carbon neutrality by 2025 in line with the Airport Carbon Accreditation (ACA) program. We maintained our Level 3 'Optimisation' ACA during the period and are actively implementing initiatives that will reduce our fuel consumption and improve our energy efficiency.

During the period, our Scope 1 and 2 emissions reduced by four per cent and our carbon intensity 10 continued a five-year downwards trend, taking our reduction in carbon intensity since 2010 to 34.5 per cent.

A key step in our pathway to carbon neutrality is to improve our fuel and energy efficiency and continue to grow onsite renewable generation. Energy consumption from solar more than doubled this year following the commissioning of a 550kw rooftop solar PV array.

Sydney Airport reduced the overall number of pool cars in its fleet during the reporting period and replaced three petrol cars with hybrid electric cars.

We continued our lighting replacement program in our terminals, upgrading to LED lighting in wayfinding signage at T1 this year. We also upgraded airfield and landside lighting systems, including the installation of a new lighting control system in the baggage reclaim halls which allows us to switch to power savings modes during curfew periods. We completed the replacement of our taxiway and stop bar signs with LED lights, which are more reliable, visible and use less energy, and we reviewed the use of moving walkways and escalators to reduce energy consumption.

Emissions intensity

(tCO2e/passenger)

3.05

2.79

2.73

2.59

2.44

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Emissions breakdown

91%

9%

93%

7%

Scope 1

Scope 2

Scope 3

  1. All environment data is reported for the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019. Sydney Airport assumed operational control of utility services for T3 in July 2019, and the associated data will be included in subsequent reports
  2. Based on 2010 levels
  3. kgCO2-eper passenger

22 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

We continued to purchase offsets for emissions from our car fleet and expanded the program to include our non-electric landside bus fleet and staff travel, covering 784tCO2e.

We improved our Scope 3 reporting and methodology in 2019. During the year our Scope 3 emissions were 884ktCO2e. While the majority of Scope 3 emissions are caused by sources outside our ownership and control, we are working to support business partners and others to act to reduce these emissions.

We continue to provide airport infrastructure to support an increased utilisation rate of Ground Power Units (GPU) and Pre-Conditioned Air (PCA) as well as to minimise Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) usage and fuel burn on the airfield. This has the benefit of reduced CO2 and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) emissions, creating a healthier working environment on the airfield and reducing ground-based noise from running engines at the gate. See the 'Supporting our communities' section of this report for more on how we work with our stakeholders to reduce Scope 3 emissions.

NOx and Suspended Particulate Matter levels across the airport are directly related to fuel consumption across the airport. They remained steady during the period.

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Water management

Sydney Airport is committed to the responsible use of water across the precinct. The major uses of water at Sydney Airport during the period continued to be restroom and toilet facilities within the terminals, cooling towers for air conditioning, construction and maintenance activities and vehicle washing facilities.

Our onsite water treatment plant was built in 2009 and supplies recycled water to T1. In its 10th year of operation, it treated more than 197,000 KL of water, an increase of more than 31,800 KL on the prior year. This is the equivalent of 78 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

This year, 30 per cent of our water consumption at T1 was from recycled sources. This water is used for toilet flushing and cooling towers.

Despite this, our total water

consumption increased by 14 per cent due to additional demand on cooling systems across the terminals.

Waste management

During 2019, total waste generation at the airport reduced by two per cent and we diverted

43 per cent of nonquarantine waste generated from landfill.

We worked with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney to develop a threestage roadmap to reduce waste across all streams on the airport precinct. We will begin implementation of the strategy in 2020.

We continued to work with retailers to remove single-use plastic bags and straws. We set ourselves the target to remove these from retailers in T1 by

2021 and this year we exceeded this

goal, securing the removal of plastic bags and straws from all three terminals across 113 tenancies.

This year we adopted organic waste recovery with our T1 landside retailers, following a successful trial in 2018 and expanded the program to include food waste as well as coffee grounds. This waste is transported to a waste to energy facility to generate renewable electricity.

Customers consistently request more water fountains across the precinct. Three new water bottle refilling stations were installed across T1 and T2 this year, bringing the total number of water fountains and refilling stations across the airport to 31. Refills at these new stations are averaging 1,400 vessels per day supporting a reduction in plastic bottle waste generation.

24 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Profile

Working together with retail partners to reduce waste

We are working hard to reduce waste in and around our terminals.

Throughout 2019, we worked with our retail partners across the airport to remove single use plastic bags and straws from terminals.

The support and enthusiasm of our retailers and the retail team at Sydney Airport means we have achieved our three-year target in just one year.

WH Smith removed single-use plastic bags from its stores, and donates profits from the sale of re-useable bags to Clean Up Australia. The Mantra Airport Hotel operates a plastic free bar, and our Duty Free partner Heinemann has replaced plastic bags from its stores at T1 with reusable bags, saving an estimated one million bags from this store alone from landfill every year.

Retailers have reported they have had a fantastic response from customers to the initiative, and many are already planning to do more to reduce waste.

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Wetlands and vegetation management

Sydney Airport is home to the Sydney Airport Wetlands, which are designated as an environmentally significant area under the Airports Act 1996. They are part of the larger Botany Wetlands system, which runs from Centennial Park to Botany Bay, and considered to be one of the last remaining green corridors in the Sydney area.

We continued to manage and maintain this important environmental asset undertaking bush regeneration works. More than 13,800 tubestock of native wetlands species were planted

after the removal of noxious weeds.

Any vegetation removed for construction projects were offset on site with native plants. Plants were selected so as not to attract birds and minimise bird strike risk.

Our commitment to operating the airport sustainably and reducing our environmental footprint contributes to achieving the sustainable management and efficient use of resources.

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Our people

We recognise our people are fundamental to our ongoing success.

This year, we launched a new organisational purpose 'Making Sydney proud every day'. This reflects our goal to make a positive impact every day in the community, with our customers, for NSW and Australia more broadly.

We also launched a new HR Information System to simplify our people processes. The new system will provide solutions for onboarding, people data, time and attendance, payroll, performance,

and recruitment. It will allow our people and their managers to operate more efficiently and provides capability for future growth and integration.

Our workforce is made up of over 500 employees, with the majority of these in full time, permanent roles. This is an increase on the prior reporting period.

Employee turnover increased in

2019 following an organisational restructure. We are working to reduce this by improving our learning and development offerings, strengthening career pathways and building stronger employee engagement.

We're focused on making sure Sydney Airport is a place our employees love to work. In surveys conducted during the year, our people told us they feel safe when they are at work, believe the work they do is meaningful and are excited about Sydney Airport's future. In 2020, we are working to enhance the experience of our people at work by continuing to build a great culture, improving collaboration between teams, communicating regularly and recognising performance and achievement.

Learning and development

We want to develop and maintain a culture that supports our people to reach their full potential.

We provided 15.5 average hours of training per employee, an increase on last year. This year, we focused on improving access to programs and tools and introduced a number of new learning and development opportunities for our people.

Average hours of training

(per employee)

15.5

14.1

11.9

9.3

10

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

To facilitate more effective development planning and career conversations,

we relaunched our Individual Development Planning (IDP) process across the organisation in early 2019. This involved sessions for individual employees and training to equip leaders to have career discussions with their team.

We launched a new Educational Support Policy in 2019, which facilitates the ongoing development of employee capability through external tertiary programs. Since the launch in March, we have received 20 applications and approved 19

of these. We have committed $90,000 since the program's launch.

We also introduced LinkedIn Learning for all employees, which provides access to an on-demand library of instructional videos and courses covering a range of business, software and creative skills. We continued to deliver Certificate

4 in Aviation (Aviation Supervision)

and Certificate 3 in Aviation

(Aerodrome Operations).

For the first time, we subscribed to the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) for leadership and professional development programs. This subscription gives 50 nominated employees access to a full range of AIM short courses. Since July 2019, we have had over 500 hours of learning completed with AIM.

Our offering in 2019 has also included a range of mandatory and elective sessions for our operational teams. Examples of this have been Wildlife Management for our airfield teams

as well as Conflict Management for our aviation and service teams. We also provide quarterly operational safety training for our baggage handing and facilities maintenance employees. These sessions have incorporated Manual Handling, First Attack Fire Fighting, Safety Risk Assessments, Injury Management and Hot Works.

We held 20 lunch and learn 'SYDTalks' sessions covering topics as diverse as Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking in conjunction with the Australian Federal Police to Fundamentals of Finance, with an average of 60 people attending each session.

We encourage our people to apply for internal job opportunities as a way to further develop their skills and experience, and continue their career at Sydney Airport. During the year, 31 per cent of roles were filled by internal candidates.

Diversity and inclusion

Part of making Sydney proud every day is our commitment to fostering workplace diversity and inclusion.

This year, we refreshed our Diversity and Inclusion strategy with a renewed focus on building a robust foundation and engagement across the business through:

  • Talent management practices including recruitment, promotion and development of talent
  • Reward and Recognition programs, including remuneration, benefits and gender pay gap
  • Ability to retain our people, including belonging, flexibility, careers and capability

26 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

To support the development of the new strategy we conducted a diversity and inclusion survey to better understand our workforce. We learned that we come from 46 countries and speak over 30 languages, with 30 per cent of us speaking a language other than English at home. It is positive to learn that 75% of respondents felt comfortable bringing their whole selves to work, and over two thirds expressed they feel that Sydney Airport is an inclusive place to work.

We reviewed our Diversity Council and Working Group which has executive sponsorship from our Chief Commercial Officer and Chief Financial Officer.

The Diversity Council is supported by six working groups made up of representatives from the business, who are focussed on driving meaningful action and change around the priorities identified in the diversity survey.

The number of female employees across the organisation remained consistent with 2018 at 39 per cent, while the number of women in management roles increased from 35 per cent in 2018 to

37 per cent in 2019. Our gender pay ratio continued to improve, up from 93.4 in 2018 to 95.9 this year continuing our three-year upward trend.

Our commitment to supporting equality for all and promoting a diverse and inclusive workplace contributes to ensuring equal opportunity

and promoting socioeconomic inclusion.

Profile

Tim Greenway, Sydney Airport Project Manager

This year, we introduced a new program to provide educational support to eligible employees to undertake external courses of study relevant to their work at Sydney Airport.

One of our first round participants was Project Manager Tim Greenway. He completed the final module of his Master in Project Management - "Project Management in Peripheral Communities". The module requires students to take the skills learned throughout their Masters, apply them to not for profit organisations and support communities with the development of basic infrastructure.

As part of the course, Tim visited Cambodia to launch a building program that teaches school leavers basic construction skills. The program gives young adults a chance to learn important skills and set them up for a brighter future.

Working in a small team made up of architects, construction undergraduates, project managers and supervisors - the majority without building experience - Tim and the team built a classroom and a workshop in 38-degree temperatures and 100 per cent humidity.

"Being supported to finish my studies really took the financial pressure off and meant I could experience something different to bring back to my work at Sydney Airport," Tim said.

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Fair and ethical business

Our Code of Conduct sets the standard for how we work together to operate the airport in a safe, secure, responsible and ethical manner. It underpins a culture of high ethical standards and integrity. We introduced a new online Code of Conduct training module for all employees to ensure everyone understands what is expected of them. Employees will be required to undertake refresher training each year with 82 per cent completing their training in 2019.

Our respect for human rights is enshrined in our Human Rights Policy, which we first introduced in 2017. We aligned our practices with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and continued as members of the UNGC and the Global Compact Network Australia's Modern Slavery Community of Practice.

Supplier Code of Conduct

Our Supplier Code of Conduct sets out how we manage our relationships with suppliers and our minimum expectations. It covers areas including health and safety, corporate governance, workplace conditions and human rights. Our procurement spend mainly related to construction projects, security services, and facilities management services including cleaning services and baggage handling operations.

During the year we assessed

25 suppliers against the expectations set out in the Supplier Code of Conduct. This accounts for 72 per cent of our inscope third party spend.

The majority of those suppliers met or exceeded our expectations, with six supplier improvement plans issued. The areas identified for improvement centred around:

  • Plans or initiatives supporting engagement of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander employment, business or communities
  • Coverage of bribery and corruption within submitted policies
  • Training of key policy documents (e.g. work health and safety, governance)
  • Lack of reference to Fair Work within submitted documents

Pleasingly, these suppliers actioned the gaps identified in their individual supplier improvement plans and all outstanding items were closed during 2019.

We continue to support the Business Council of Australia's Australian Supplier Payment Code, which is designed to support the long-term viability of small businesses. We have reviewed the suppliers we engage and can confirm all small business supplier payment terms are 30 days from the date of the invoice.

Updating our Whistleblower Policy

We reviewed and updated our Whistleblower Policy following changes to the Corporations Act 2001 and Taxation Administration Act 1953.

This updated Policy was approved by the Audit and Risk Committee of the Board. Our Directors and Executive Committee participated in refresher training on the process for handling any whistleblower complaints they may receive directly. We communicated the revised policy

to all employees via direct email and improved information available to all employees on our intranet about our whistleblowing process. We will continue to embed this process in 2020.

People wishing to raise a concern can do so via Sydney Airport's whistleblower hotline HALO, which is accessible 24/7. They can also make reports to authorised people within the business including the General Counsel, members of the Executive Leadership Team or the General Manager of Human Resources, who is also the Whistleblower Protection Officer. Reports can be made anonymously, and people who report concerns will be supported and protected from reprisal or detriment.

During 2019, one whistleblower report was received and this remains under investigation.

28 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Profile

AFP and Anti-Slavery Australia Forced Marriage campaign

In 2019, Sydney Airport was proud to support a partnership between the AFP and Anti-Slavery Australia to raise awareness of forced marriage, one of the forms of modern slavery.

Late in 2019, custom-designed posters were rolled out in bathrooms and offices across the airport as a part of a six-month pilot program. Bathrooms were targeted for the campaign as this is one of the few locations victims of this crime are on their own and may be in a position to seek help.

Sydney Airport supported the campaign by showing the posters on key digital advertising screens to extend the reach of the campaign.

AFP Assistant Commissioner Debbie Platz, National Manager Crime Operations, hopes the initiative brings an often unspoken practice into the spotlight.

"Supporting people in Australia who are at risk of forced marriages - particularly vulnerable teenagers - is crucial, as we recognise that disruption and deterrence can have a far-reaching and lasting impact in our communities," Assistant Commissioner Platz said.

Identifying and tackling modern slavery

Modern slavery is a key human rights risk, both in operations and supply chains.

This year we completed a risk assessment for modern slavery in our business and in our supply chain, identifying high risk areas. Existing controls for these risks were reviewed, and where necessary, we strengthened these to ensure we are not doing business with individuals or companies that profit from modern slavery. We will continue to review and strengthen our risk controls over 2020.

We developed a roadmap for the next 18 months to strengthen or implement controls to meet stakeholder expectations and in preparation for reporting under the Commonwealth Modern Slavery Act 2018 in early 2021.

Combatting illegal wildlife trafficking

This year, Sydney Airport signed the United for Wildlife Transport Taskforce Buckingham Palace Declaration to join the fight against illegal wildlife trafficking. The Buckingham Palace Declaration is an agreement which sets out tangible steps that can be taken to close the routes exploited by traffickers of the illegal wildlife trade as they attempt

to smuggle their products from rare and vulnerable ecosystems. Australia's unique wildlife is often a target of illegal wildlife trafficking, which makes Sydney Airport especially proud to support this important initiative.

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Planning for the future

Delivering operational excellence through innovative technology-based solutions and supporting customer needs now and into the future

34.5%

4.19/5

reduction of emissions intensity

overall customer

(per passenger) since 2010

satisfaction rating

75%

Sydney Gateway

of current load contracted

road project

via a renewable energy PPA

enabling direct airport

access from motorways

30 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Climate resilience

Sydney Airport is an essential piece of regional and national infrastructure which supports the mobility and economic growth of the communities we serve. Our infrastructure and operations deliver high levels of availability, reliability and resilience and we recognise climate change has the potential to affect our business through physical, transitional and regulatory changes.

We recognise our need to contribute to addressing climate change, and restrict global temperature increases to less than 2°C in line with the Paris Agreement.

We are committed to reducing our emissions footprint, improving our operational resilience and adapting to the predicted effects of a changing climate now and into the future.

We are supporters of the TCFD and have disclosed our climate change risk management in line with their reporting framework since 2018.

During the year, we reassessed potential impacts and consequences of climate change on the airport business and operations in our updated Climate Risk and Adaptation Plan. This enables us to prioritise and better respond to climate risks. We assessed both physical and transition risks under three scenarios based on Representation Concentration Pathways (RCPs) outlined in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report and International Energy Agency (IEA) scenarios outlined in the World Energy Outlook 2018.

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Pathway to carbon neutral

At Sydney Airport, we are on a pathway to be carbon neutral by 2025, in line with ACI's Airport Carbon Accreditation Scheme. Our pathway considers various decarbonisation options ranging from energy efficiency, strategic sourcing of renewables, engagement and carbon offsets. A priority-based hierarchy is applied to ensure the transition provides flexibility in growth, a balanced risk portfolio and commercial competitiveness while striving to achieve carbon neutrality.

future the for Planning

Energy efficiency

Renewable Power

Onsite

Purchase Agreements

renewables

Carbon offsets

Engage and influence

our Supporting

Reductions in energy consumption reduces our emissions.

We aim to implement cost effective energy saving opportunities as part of an Energy Savings Plan which includes:

  • Efficient equipment, materials and fixtures
  • Systems optimisation and monitoring to reduce operational energy use
  • Consumption behaviour and education

A renewable energy PPA is a commercial arrangement to purchase the output of a renewable energy project.

Our first renewable energy PPA was completed in late 2018. We will continue to implement a renewable energy procurement strategy which considers PPAs to source electricity from renewable sources.

Onsite renewable generation reduces the amount of non-renewable electricity Sydney Airport draws from the grid.

We currently have one rooftop solar installation on our P6 carpark.

Sydney Airport has identified a number of further potential onsite solar locations and will continue to work to increase our onsite generation.

Carbon offsets that provide socio-economic benefits will be used to offset emissions that can no longer be feasibly managed through

our energy efficiency, renewable purchase and generation strategies.

We will continue to monitor and review the role offsets play in our neutrality pathway.

Although our boundary for carbon neutrality covers our Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions, we aim to actively engage with airline and retail business partners to influence a reduction in emissions outside our operational control (Scope 3).

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Planning for the future

Climate adaptation planning

We understand the need to ensure that our assets are designed and maintained to withstand future climatic conditions.

We identified priority physical and transition climate-related risks and opportunities in the 2019 Climate Change Risk Assessment and Adaptation Plan and are implementing adaptation actions to address these.

Our adaptation themes consider best practice in climate change adaptation and flood mitigation at national and international airports as well as Sydney Airport's ability to control and influence action. The actions describe mechanisms to embed climate change adaptation and resilience into airport planning, design and operations.

Climate resilience commitment

Integrate Sydney Airport's position on climate resilience into decision making and investment

Future-planning and strategy

Integrate priority climate resilience responses into corporate strategy and planning

Rapid response and operations

Understand risks and proactively manage operational disruptions to minimise impacts

Interdependent systems

Continue to enhance relationships with stakeholders to anticipate change and address critical system interdependencies

32 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Electrification of vehicle fleet

Under a flagship commitment in our

2019-2021 Sustainability Strategy, we are committed to the electrification of our own vehicle fleet and investing in infrastructure which supports our business partners to make the transition to an electric fleet.

We were Australia's first airport to use electric buses as part of our commitment to low emission ground transport technology. Our commitment is to have a 100 per cent electric landside bus fleet by the end of 2021.

The fleet of electric buses will deliver carbon emission reductions in the long term and improve local air quality through zero tailpipe emissions. The fleet will also lower external noise levels, reduce waste fluids to zero and decrease the amount of toxic material generated during servicing.

Sydney Airport is also seeking to facilitate and support an increase in Sydney Airport owned airside electric vehicle use to

50 per cent by the end of 2021.

In addition, we are working with our airport business partners to support the electrification of the airside Ground Service Equipment (GSE) fleet. A smooth transition to electric equipment is a key component of the AOL, and we are working with stakeholders to facilitate this. The transition from diesel equipment to electric will deliver environmental benefits and health benefits for workers on the airfield and in the bag rooms.

We are also incorporating infrastructure required to support electrification of the airside vehicle and GSE fleet into planning and design for new developments.

This includes forward planning to incorporate charging stations for electric vehicles and GSE.

We continue to work with tenants wanting to install charging stations for electric vehicles on the airport.

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Planning for the future

Sustainable development of the airport

Our Master Plan 2039 is designed to maximise the capacity of the airport to meet demand within existing operational constraints. We commenced an apron expansion program to provide an additional four aircraft layover bays and improve the taxiway network servicing the aprons. We also finalised design work for the re-sheeting of the main runway in early 2020.

Opportunities for energy efficiency and emission reductions are reviewed during the design phase of new projects on the airport. We commissioned a Water Sensitive Urban Design feasibility study to better understand the ways we can contribute to improved water quality in the local area.

We also continued to provide aircraft with access to ground power and preconditioned air. We extended pre-conditioned air to existing remote stands for the South West Sector aprons in 2019.

Airspace and airfield efficiency

Airspace and airfield efficiency is one of Sydney Airport's flagship initiatives for 2019-2021, and is focused on supporting future growth through the utilisation and optimisation of our asset.

During the year, we progressed our airfield efficiency objectives. We commenced the construction of additional aprons, taxiways, aircraft support infrastructure and baggage facilities. These projects include:

  • Provision of fuel infrastructure to the Northern Ponds apron to improve operational flexibility and efficiency to allow the aircraft to arrive and depart from this location without towing to and from the terminal and incurring runway crossings
  • The development of the South East Sector apron and
    Taxiways J and D. This will provide four additional aircraft stands, ground power and preconditioned air, fuel infrastructure as well a new Taxiways J and D to enhance operational outcomes and improved efficiency of the airfield
  • The development of a new ULD storage area to manage safe storage of ULDs used for baggage. The new storage area ensures containers are stored off the ground in accordance with industry standards and in a secure manner to protect them from damage. This also improves safety and efficiency on the airfield

We actively participated in Airservices Australia's Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM) program during the year. This is the first network-wide implementation of A-CDM, with airports, key airlines and Airservices, working together to implement the program at Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth airports. A-CDM has the potential to improve the way airports, aircraft operators, ground handling organisations and Air Traffic Control work to harmonise airport operations.

34 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

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Planning for the future

Meeting our TCFD Roadmap

We completed the 2019 activities in our TCFD Roadmap this year, which included expanding our scenario analysis, updating our climate risk and adaptation plan, strengthening internal engagement on climate risk and reviewing our climate-related targets.

2018

Public support for TCFD Recommendations

Conduct gap analysis against disclosure areas

Identify internal team to assess and manage climate-related risks and opportunities

2019

Expand scenario analysis

Review and update climate change risk and adaptation plan

Internal engagement and training on climate risk

Review targets

2020

  • Further integrate scenario analysis into strategic planning and risk management framework
  • Consider more detailed scenarios including transitional risks and risks to the industry more broadly
  • Develop third party mitigation strategies and collaborate more broadly
  • Report on metrics for assessing climate-related risks and opportunities

Governance and oversight of climate-related risks

Our Board oversees climate risk management and its potential to influence and inform corporate strategy and decision making. The Board is supported by the Safety, Security and Sustainability Committee which meets quarterly and has oversight of environmental and sustainability matters.

During 2019, we reviewed the Charter for the Safety, Sustainability and Security Committee and it continues to include climate change. The committee received briefings on the outcomes of our climate risk assessment and adaptation planning. Further support is provided by the Audit and Risk Committee which maintains oversight of risk management and internal controls.

Sydney Airport has an established team dedicated to managing our TCFD journey and monitoring material climate change issues. The team met several

times this year to update our climate risk assessment, review existing controls and discuss climate developments relevant to our operating context. The team also advises the Executive Committee and our Board on climate risk planning, and emerging issues and trends that may impact the broader strategy.

The Sustainability and Environment teams are responsible for annual reporting, compliance reporting and initial risk assessment of climate-related risks and opportunities.

Climate resilience strategy

Our sustainability strategy forms an integral part of our broader corporate strategy. A flagship program under our strategy is to build resilience in our assets and operations to the impacts associated with climate change, and to minimise the airport's emissions footprint. Climate-related risks and opportunities are also incorporated into the Airport Environment Strategy.

We review our commercial, operational, regulatory and financial risks and uncertainties associated with operating Australia's busiest airport each year

in our annual planning process. Climate change and its impact on operations has been identified as a material risk. Our Climate Risk Assessment and Adaptation Plan identifies climate-related risks and adaptation actions and sets out our management and monitoring approach. The plan is included in operational considerations and was updated in 2019.

As aviation and weather are closely linked, airport operations and infrastructure development must consider climatic conditions. We understand the need to ensure our assets are designed and maintained to withstand future climatic conditions.

We see achieving carbon neutral operations by 2025 as a contribution to the goals of the Paris Agreement.

36 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Scenario analysis

Climate scenario analysis forms a key organisational control to identify and manage climate change risk.

In 2019, we conducted climate scenario analysis to understand the risks and opportunities for our business using three scenarios based on RCPs outlined in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and IEA scenarios outlined in the World Energy Outlook 2018.

Given the global scale of the IPCC and IEA scenarios, physical and transition aspects of Sydney Airport's scenario analysis were further refined through

downscaled climate change modelling available through the Climate Change in Australia portal, developed by CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology, and the NSW and ACT Regional Climate Modelling (NARCliM) Project.

Outcomes of the Deep Decarbonisation Pathways Project, current Australian and New South Wales government policies and the 2019 Australian National Outlook were drawn on to inform potential transition pathways.

We aim to develop and use signposts to help us understand which scenario grows in dominance while exploring the potential implications for us both in an orderly and a more rapid transition to a 2°C world. This will enable us

to continually adapt our approach, implement priority adaptation actions and evolve to deliver long term shareholder value.

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Scenario

IPCC Climate Scenario

IEA Scenario

Risk Assessment Focus

Business as usual

A high emissions pathway

IEA Current

Physical risks

scenario RCP8.5

where physical impacts

Policies Scenario (6°C)

and opportunities

(3.2 - 5.4°C)

increase over time,

particularly the intensity and

frequency of extreme events.

Transition risks are limited

in this scenario

Moderate transition

A moderate emissions

IEA INDC Scenario (2.6°C)

Sensitivity test for moderate

scenario RCP4.5

pathway resulting in

physical and transition risks

(1.7 - 3.2°C)

both moderate physical

and opportunities

and transition risks

for Sydney Airport

Accelerated transition

A low emissions

IEA Sustainable Development

Transition risks

scenario RCP2.6

pathway which requires

Scenario (1.5-2°C)

and opportunities

(0.9 - 2.3°C)

implementation of

ambitious global and local

climate change policy

community our Supporting

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Planning for the future

Climate risk management and controls

Our Enterprise Risk Management Framework and Risk Management Policy guide our approach to risk management in relation to climate change. Senior management assists the Board by monitoring key aspects of the risk framework, including policies, delegation of approvals required, risk management reporting, operational control assessments and due diligence.

We have identified climate change risk as significant in our annual reporting since 2017. It is also an area of focus under the Responsible Business and Planning for the Future pillars of our 2019-2021 Sustainability Strategy. It is included in our companywide risk register and is subject to ongoing reviews to ensure relevancy and focus on risks associated with climate change and the transition towards a low-carbon economy.

Driver

Risk

Existing and future control/s

Physical risk

Greater rainfall and Airside disruptions due to flooding and storm frequency and damage on airport

intensity

Airport Emergency Plan Regular inspections of airfield Stormwater drainage systems

Maintenance teams in place to repair damage and/ or drainage failures

Thunderstorm Warning System

Airfield management e.g. temporary closure of taxiways and aprons

Landside disruption due to flooding

Integrated Operations Centre monitors transport

and damage to metropolitan

network around the airport

transport infrastructure

Traffic Management Centre liaison

Sea level rise and

Operational disruptions, increased

Inspections of airfield and sea walls

tidal intrusion

frequency and duration of repair and

Stormwater drainage systems

maintenance activities

Maintenance teams in place to repair damage and/

or drainage failures

Reduced land for future

Considered in strategic planning

development capacity

Higher temperatures and more severe heatwaves

Transition risk

Increased staff and / or passenger medical

Procedures in place for outdoor workers

incidents due to heat exposure

More stringent biosecurity requirements and

Airport Emergency Plan

potential for disease outbreaks due to global

increase of communicable diseases

Increased cost and disruption to airside and

Back-up generators to maintain

landside power supply due to increased

critical infrastructure

energy demand during heatwaves

Energy efficiency initiatives

Onsite generation

Legislative changes

Government climate change policy may

Policy engagement and advocacy

limit air travel emissions, increase cost pass

through and change travel patterns, resulting

in reductions in anticipated passenger

volumes and associated revenue

Regulatory changes mandate zero carbon

Consideration in strategic planning

design and building standards, increasing

development costs and delivery timeframes

Decline in local

Decline of environmental tourism and

Policy engagement and advocacy

and international

impact of climate (flood, drought, fire,

environmental assets

dust) causes changes to international and

domestic passenger volumes, reducing

anticipated revenue

38 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Climate-related risks and opportunities

We held internal workshops to assess the materiality of climate-related risks and opportunities across the medium (2030) and long term (2090), using climate change scenarios.

The workshops shortlisted priority risks, evaluated existing climate risk controls and developed adaptation and mitigation actions. Priority physical and transition risks were integrated into business wide risk registers and monitored through standard risk management processes.

These risks have an inherent risk rating of medium over the medium term and high over the long term. Medium risks are classified as requiring senior management attention and a mitigation action plan. High risks require executive attention, immediate action and ongoing monitoring.

Sydney Airport's contribution to climate change solutions will also present new opportunities. These include:

  • Supporting the move to a
    carbonconstrained world by working with airline partners to provide infrastructure to support further electrification and low emission fuels
  • Integrating climate adaptation opportunities into community investment strategies aimed at

supporting the resilience of our communities and their support for our activities

  • Lower operating costs by reducing energy consumption.

This year, Sydney Airport joined Bioenergy Australia's Sustainable Aviation Fuel Alliance, together with airlines and other airports, to create a collaborative environment to advance sustainable aviation fuel production, policy, education and marketing in Australia and New Zealand.

Climate-related metrics and targets

We monitor and disclose the following metrics annually in our Sustainability Report which assists in understanding climate-related risks:

  • Direct and indirect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (Scope 1, 2 and 3)
  • Emissions intensity per passenger
  • Energy consumption by source including renewables
  • Onsite generation
  • Waste generation, disposal and intensity (per passenger)
  • Water consumption

We will continue to review climate indicators developed for our scenario analysis on an ongoing basis to understand and monitor evolving climate change trajectories.

Our climate resilience targets also support our ability to manage climaterelated risks and opportunities. They are:

  • Follow the recommendations of the TCFD in public disclosure
  • Achieve carbon neutrality by 2025, in line with the ACI's Airport Carbon Accreditation Scheme
  • Reduce carbon emissions per passenger by 50 per cent from 2010 baseline levels by 2025

As part of our goal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2025, we will increase the share of renewable energy we purchase and generate.

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Planning for the future

Customer experience

Our customers tell us that an easy, seamless and enjoyable journey is what is most important to them.

We are focused on investing in improvements and initiatives which make a real difference to the experience of our customers.

Creating a great customer experience

We continue to improve customer satisfaction each year.

In 2018, we set ourselves a target to maintain our customer satisfaction rating to above four out of five.

This year, we achieved our highest ever customer satisfaction rating. Across all terminals, we achieved a rating of 4.19 out of five, with T1 rating 4.21 out of five, up from 4.13 in 2018, and our domestic terminals, achieving a rating of 4.16 out of five, up from 4.14 last year.

Customer satisfaction rating

(out of five)

4.13 4.14

4.21 4.16

4.01

3.89 3.91

3.95

3.83

3.85

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

International

Domestic

We invested in projects to improve customer experience across all of our terminals. This year, we delivered new bathrooms in T1 and more than 1,000 new charging points across T1 and

T2. Further retail, food and beverage enhancements provided more choice and additional seating for customers. We have also increased the number of e-directories to 24 with the installation of five new devices for locating services. We continue to improve wayfinding across the precinct and are focused on strengthening our international arrivals experience. We listen to and deliver

for customers by ensuring our priority projects reflect what our customers tell us is important.

Improving accessibility

It is important to work together as airports to ensure a seamless experience for passengers who may require additional assistance.

We are committed to providing inclusive and accessible facilities for all passengers and visitors. This year, airports across Australia have been working to continue to improve accessibility for passengers through the Australian Airports Association's Customer Experience Committee, which Sydney Airport chairs.

In an Australian airport first, Sydney Airport launched a partnership with Aira, an international technology company. Aira provides a service that enables blind and low vision travellers to

confidently navigate the airport through a smartphone connection. Sydney Airport covers the cost of the service for passengers departing or arriving in Sydney, allowing them to connect to an Aira agent via a smartphone app. The Aira-trained professional provides on-demand, personalised access to information to enhance the everyday experience of the user. Since its launch in May, the service has been used in the airport's terminals for over 660 minutes.

We upgraded infrastructure across the airport to improve accessibility. A Changing-Places accredited bathroom was opened at T1 Arrivals, which includes full-sized changing tables and hoists to assist people with profound disabilities. At T1 and T2 we built assistance animal facilities which are wheelchair accessible and contain an artificial turf area, a disposable bin and water bowl for companion animals. Our parent room also achieved an Australian Breastfeeding Association five-star rating, the highest rating available.

In recent months, we have refreshed our assistance webpage. We published a journey planner and introduced sensory maps of our three terminals which help customers identify high, medium and low sensory areas. This helps customers prepare for their journey and understand where they will encounter additional noise and crowded areas, and to identify areas where they can stop in a quieter area if required.

40 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Profile:

Jack Tyrrell, Centre for Inclusive Design

This year we launched Aira at Sydney Airport, a service that assists the visually impaired to navigate unfamiliar spaces.

Before launching Aira, Sydney Airport worked with Jack Tyrrell from the Centre for Inclusive Design to test the app and understand how people who are blind or have low vision use the airport.

Jack is a regular traveller and says having access to Aira has positively changed his travel experience at Sydney Airport.

"When I used to go to the airport, I'd go from the train station directly to my boarding gate as I was not able to distinguish what was around like shops and cafes. With Aira, I can now experience the airport the same way everyone else can and even enjoy a beer!".

Aira's partnership with Sydney Airport was recognised by the Australian Airports Association with the 2019 National Airport Industry Award for Customer Experience.

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In Europe, travellers who wish to

selfidentify as having a hidden disability wear a lanyard with a sunflower design. This allows the teams at security screening and passport control to identify these travellers and acknowledge they may need more time and support through processes. We completed the soft launch of this model in 2019 to drive global consistency. Specialised training will be completed early next year to facilitate a formal launch of our hidden disability program.

This year we were one of six airports that contributed to the development of ACI's 'Airport Customer Experience Accreditation'. This program supports airports globally to assess and improve their approach to customer experience management through five levels of accreditation. We have been recognised with Level 2 accreditation.

Our commitment to improving our customers' experience was recognised in 2019, reflecting the positive impact our projects have had on our customers. Sydney Airport was awarded the

Customer Experience Award at the Australian Airports Association (AAA) National Airport Industry Awards. We were also recognised by the Customer Service Institute at the Australian Service Excellence with our partnership with Aira winning the 2019 Customer Impact Project Service Champion.

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Planning for the future

Access to and from the airport

Sydney Gateway is a NSW Government road project to connect the city's motorway network to the airport. Once complete, Sydney Gateway and WestConnex will provide a faster connection from the airport to greater Sydney and assist in taking traffic not destined for the airport off surrounding roads. Currently, about half of the traffic on Airport Drive during the peak periods is not destined for the airport.

With 70 per cent of the project's construction taking place on Sydney Airport land, we are working closely with Road and Maritime Services (RMS) now to facilitate the development of the project. This year, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for NSW Government approvals, and a Major Development Plan (MDP) for Commonwealth Government approvals, were developed and placed on public display. There are

18 environmental chapters in the EIS and MDP, covering topics including traffic, transport and access, noise and vibration, airport operations and air quality.

Over the year we implemented a number of successful initiatives to improve traffic flows within the domestic and international airport precincts. These included creating an additional drop

off zone for passengers at T1 during the morning peak, which reduced delay times from 11 minutes to one minute for vehicles arriving along Airport Drive and from 13 minutes to nine minutes for vehicles arriving from Marsh Street. Changes to the taxi drop off areas in the domestic precincts were also introduced.

Sydney Airport became the first airport in Australia to make UberPool available in 2019 as part of its commitment

to deliver greater choice and value to customers. The service supports further reductions in congestion,

encouraging people to share services and reduce the total number of vehicles at the airport. We expect this will lead to improved traffic flows over the long term, while also offering a cheaper option

for passengers.

We are also exploring the introduction of electric charging stations for commercial operators within the domestic precinct and at our valet services to allow vehicles to be recharged while passengers

are travelling.

By supporting and investing in adequate road and transport infrastructure we contribute to providing access to safe, affordable, accessible and sustainable transport systems.

Delay times

reduced by

Marsh

St

Alexandra Canal

25%

Cooks River

Airport Drive

Airport Drive

when arriving from Marsh St

Airport

Drive

toCity Exit

Express Pick-up

Priority Pick-up

P7P6

Delay times

reduced by almost

90%

when arriving from Airport Dr

KEY

 To General Parking

 To Free Kerbside drop off  To Free Drop Off

42 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Innovation and technology

We are committed to embracing innovation and technology across our business and looking for new and improved ways of doing things. We see opportunities to adopt innovative solutions that enhance the passenger experience, improve the operations of the airport and allow us to engage more effectively with our community.

Investing in innovation

We are investing in technology to make the airport experience easier for our passengers.

Biometrics will provide an improved experience for Sydney Airport passengers by removing the need to queue and show passports and boarding passes at various steps of the journey. This year, we hosted IATA's One ID

Advisory biometrics think tank with more than 100 representatives from airlines, airports, government agencies and vendors. We concluded our landmark biometrics trial with Qantas, which has provided us with a clear understanding of how biometrics will unlock significant benefits for the airport longer term.

During the year our planning and airfield design teams worked with Boeing to assess airport compatibility with the new 777-9, one of the largest and most efficient twin-engine jets in the world. Our safety analysis was endorsed by CASA and used to assist other international airports to assess their own compatibility ahead of the launch of the new aircraft.

We were also the first airport in Australia to successfully trial an automated aerobridge docking system, working with

Air New Zealand. This allows airline operators to dock an aerobridge on to an aircraft by simply pressing a button.

The adoption of wireless charging in public spaces is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years as it is one of the most convenient charging methods.

We are trialling the Aircharge wireless charging solution at T1 arrivals to provide travellers with convenient and safe charging methods and it is soon to be deployed in the new dwell zone in Pier B of T2.

This year, we continued to roll out the installation of self-service kiosks across the airport. This technology improves processing times for airlines and improves the check in experience for passengers. The installation of these new kiosks brings the total number in T1 to 122.

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Supporting our community

Working with communities to create shared value

$5.2m

29

in community

local community

investment

organisations supported

32,000

$1.64b

people in our on-airport

economic value

community

generated via revenue

44 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Community engagement

We are committed to developing and maintaining strong links with the community.

We engage with local communities and organisations about airport operations, proposed development and future planning. We continued to be active members of the Sydney Airport Community Forum, alongside government, local mayors and representatives of the local community and aviation industry.

Our community engagement programs this year focused on the preliminary draft major development plan for the Sydney Gateway Project and the main northsouth runway resurfacing project.

In a first for a major Australian airport we established a deliberative community engagement forum, the Sydney Airport Community Panel, this year. Panel members nominated to be a part of this forum to answer the question "How can Sydney Airport support its local community?". International best practice examples were shared with panel members who also heard from key industry experts and community speakers. A series of recommendations in the areas of environment, education and employment, experience and equality were provided to Sydney Airport, which are under consideration by the executive team.

Profile

Susan Tracey, Sydney Airport Community Panel member

I was lucky to be a community representative selected to be on the Sydney Airport Community Panel. I found the experience a great opportunity to be part of a community-based approach with diverse views and opinions from a wide range of people with different expertise and lived experience to bring to the table. Within this disparate group, we all shared a commitment to take this opportunity to have a say with a respectful dialogue and help fulfil the brief given to us: to inform Sydney Airport how it can best help its local community.

We were privileged to have experts from the local community and the airport itself to brief us on specific topics requiring further exploration. Having

this direct line of access made for frank and open discussion across a number of topics affecting the community and gave us an understanding of how decisions are made. We learnt where Sydney Airport has authority, influence and control - and where it doesn't.

In establishing this panel, Sydney Airport gave the local community a real voice into the ear of Australia's largest and most complex airport at a grassroots level - something which I have not seen before. I really enjoyed being part of it, and I commend Sydney Airport for taking such an innovative grassroots approach to its community engagement.

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Supporting our community

Community investment

Sydney Airport is committed to making a meaningful contribution to the communities in which we live and work. We do this through a number of community initiatives, partnering with charities and community organisations that align with our values, and those of our people.

We actively participate in and support our local communities through our established grants program, and through grass roots partnerships that support the communities in which we operate.

Our investment strategy is evolving for 2020 to incorporate feedback from our Community Panel sessions, and will see Sydney Airport partner with organisations that help us create a better sense of community within our terminals, and our people.

We invest in our communities in line with three pillars: Live Local, Leading and Learning and Sydney's Airport.

In 2019, we contributed $5.2 million in value to communities in which we live and work, as verified by the LBG Australia and New Zealand. This includes $4.4 million of cash, time, in-kind donations and management costs - more than double our 2018 contribution of $2.2 million. In addition, we provided more than $720,000 in forgone revenue in the form of fees, products and services provided for community benefit.

Sydney Airport also facilitated additional contributions to the community from other sources such as customers and employees to the value of $75,700, which is referred to as 'leverage' in the LBG framework.

Live Local

We are committed to being a good neighbour and playing a role in keeping our local communities connected, healthy, vibrant and thriving

Leading and Learning

We support initiatives that provide opportunities for our leaders of tomorrow. We support those to be the best in their field, with a particular focus on supporting minority groups and reducing inequalities in our community

Sydney's Airport

We are working to strengthen relationships between the airport and our communities by supporting tourism-generating initiatives that benefit the city and local communities, and by developing a sense of place at Sydney Airport that reflects our city

Profile

Surf Life Saving Sydney

Sydney Airport has a proud 18-year partnership with Surf Life Saving Sydney, who not only train people to keep our beaches safe but also invest in our future leaders. In our centenary year, in addition to our annual partnership, we chose Surf Life Saving Sydney as our Centenary Partner and Christmas Giving Appeal funds recipient.

In 2019, over $300,000 was raised for Surf Life Saving Sydney as part of our centenary celebrations and the Christmas Giving Appeal.

One of the major fundraising events of the Christmas Giving Appeal was our annual Runway Run, which was the largest in the airport's history with more than 1,000 runners taking to the runway.

"The money raised by the Sydney Airport community will directly support the efforts of our frontline lifesavers in keeping Sydney's beaches safe," Surf Life Saving Sydney President Peter Agnew said.

"We're proud of our decades-long partnership with Sydney Airport and to be a part of the airport's centenary celebrations."

46 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

In our Centenary year, we announced a new SYD100 scholarship program in partnership with University of New South Wales (UNSW) to help foster education in the fields of aviation and commerce.

Every year for the next 100 years the SYD100 scholarship will award one full scholarship to a student from a group under-represented in aviation including indigenous students, women, students from diverse cultural backgrounds and those who are financially disadvantaged. We will also continue to work with UNSW to provide ongoing opportunities for knowledge sharing and access to airfield and operations tours for students undertaking studies in aviation.

Sydney Airport has committed to invest $12 million to establish the Community and Environmental Projects Reserve Fund with Bayside Council to deliver projects over 10 years. This year, we continued to work with Bayside Council to identify priority projects under this Fund.

The first project will be a new Greening Bayside project, to which we will contribute $1 million over five years. This will deliver extensive tree planting in streets and reserves across the Bayside local government area, with benefits for local residents and the local environment. We are also contributing $5 million over several years to the upgrade of the Botany Aquatic Centre.

Each year, our Sydney Airport Lost Property Auction 'Bid for Good' auctions off unclaimed items left in terminals to raise money for our local grassroots charities. In partnership with the Sydney Community Foundation, this year's auction raised $190,000 which was shared among nine community organisations. The major grant recipient of this year's auction was Marrickville Legal Centre, which received $100,000 to fund a financial empowerment project. This project provides at-risk women with the skills and confidence to identify financial abuse early and seek assistance.

Employee volunteering and payroll giving

Sydney Airport provides employees with access to volunteering leave and payroll giving programs so they can contribute to the communities in which we operate and their own communities. During the year,

our employees volunteered 185 hours of their time to support our community partners in the areas of education, families in need, health and the environment.

Through our scholarship and community development programs we support the increase in the number of young people who have access to relevant skills.

Who we are proud to support

Marrickville Legal Centre was the major grant recipient from the proceeds of the 2019 Bid for Good lost property auction. This $100,000 grant will fund a financial empowerment project targeting at-risk women.

In addition to the major grant awarded from our lost property auction, smaller grants of $10,000 and $20,000 were also provided to the following organisations:

Dandelion Support Network

Providing disadvantaged families with cots, prams and baby products to help them care for their children

Carer Support Services

Supporting and training carers to look after loved ones

One Meal It Makes a Difference

Caring for the homeless community

St George Children with Disability Fund Inc.

Funding eye-gaze technology for children with disabilities

The Harding Miller Education Foundation

Furthering our funding from 2018 to provide financial and academic support for a group of disadvantaged high school students in their final year

Top Blokes Foundation

Providing a program for teenage boys in our local area, teaching them emotional resilience and positive mental health

Kooloora Community Centre

Providing an after-school program for 'at-risk'13-16 year old students

Learning Links

Providing a reading program to assist with early intervention for children with reading difficulties such as dyslexia

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Supporting our community

Reconciliation Action Plan

We recognise the special significance the land on which our airport sits holds for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This was the first year of our inaugural Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), which we officially launched during National Reconciliation Week.

We celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture at our airport with smoking ceremonies and performances for passengers and staff during NAIDOC Week, Reconciliation Week and our centenary gala celebration.

A number of events were held at the airport during National Reconciliation Week to celebrate Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander culture and heritage including daily Acknowledgement of Country and smoking ceremonies in the arrivals forecourt of T1. We also held an event for staff to learn about local Indigenous history and culture with the Gujaga Foundation and Dr Paul Irish,

a prominent academic who specialises in the history of the Aboriginal people of Sydney.

One of our goals included incorporating Indigenous suppliers into our supply chains, which we have done by procuring an Indigenous stationery supplier,

a local Indigenous photographer and formed an ongoing partnership with the Gujaga Foundation who will offer consulting services to the airport with regard to progressing our RAP goals.

We launched SYD Stories, an online platform that tells the stories and history of Sydney Airport. As part of this platform, we collaborated with local Indigenous people who have lived and managed the land around Sydney Airport and Gamay (Botany Bay) for hundreds of generations to tell their story. Go to sydstories.com.au to learn more.

We also welcomed another CareerTrackers intern at Sydney Airport this year over the summer university break in our Resilience team.

Aircraft noise

Noise from aircraft is a significant concern for people living around airports or under flight paths. A range of international and local industry players and regulatory authorities have roles and responsibilities for managing aircraft noise.

Sydney Airport works closely with the community, the aviation industry, and the Australian, NSW and local governments to manage and where possible, minimise aircraft noise impacts.

Noise sharing is the key aim of the Long-Term Operating Plan (LTOP), which involves varying the use of our runways to produce different combinations of flight paths affecting different parts of Sydney.

Noise from ground-based activities at Sydney Airport is managed separately from noise caused by in-flight aircraft operations, which is managed by Airservices Australia.

Engine ground running, which is an essential part of aircraft operations and maintenance, is regulated by a comprehensive set of operational rules designed to maintain safety, comply with relevant standards and practice,

and minimise noise. During 2019, there were two ground running noise complaints, down from 10 in 2018 and there were no breaches of the aircraft engine operating procedures.

48 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Airport community

We are striving to build a community where our on-airport partners feel a shared sense of purpose with Sydney Airport.

This year, we began developing a new Community Portal for our on-airport community. This Portal will assist us to better communicate with our airport partners, and help to foster a better culture across our precinct. It will open up direct lines of communication between Sydney Airport and the

32,000 people working across our precinct by providing them with news, updates, safety information, key project notifications, staff-only retail offers, and staff profiles. The portal will also facilitate opportunities for greater participation in activities and events at the airport.

We created a SYD Support team of employee volunteers to provide support and assistance to complement the service delivery team assisting our customers along their journey in peak times and during disruptions.

Building our safety community

With 32,000 people working on the airport every day, it's important that we all work together to create and maintain a safe working environment. This year, we introduced an Airport Safety Community, a group of safety professionals who work at the airport and represent many of the organisations and workers who make up the airport community. These people will continue to meet in 2020 to consult, cooperate and coordinate on common safety matters.

Profile

Michelle Minogue, Airport Ambassador Program Manager

Central to our airport community are our volunteer Airport Ambassadors who staff our information desks, providing assistance to help make our customers' journey as seamless as possible. They are in both the international and domestic terminals daily and help customers to find their way around the airport, answering passenger queries and generally providing a friendly face to anyone requiring assistance.

This year marks the 21st year of the Airport Ambassador program which kicked off in 1999 ahead of the Sydney Olympics. Since then, millions of visitors have been welcomed by our Ambassadors who have come to embody Australia's welcoming spirit for travellers stepping off long flights and setting foot in Sydney for the first time.

More than a quarter of our Ambassadors are multi-lingual, with 27 languages spoken across the team of 135.

Michelle Minogue runs the Airport Ambassadors program. "Our ambassadors come from a diverse range of backgrounds, including former airport and airline employees. They are a vital part of our airport team and we're grateful for their commitment to making sure our customers have a great experience at Sydney Airport."

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Supporting our community

Scope 3 emissions reduction

Scope 3 emissions arise from activities that are central to the airport's operations and that the airport can guide and influence but is outside

of our direct control. Our Scope 3 emissions are reported in line with the Airport Council International's Airport Carbon Accreditation scheme in the Environment management section of this report. These emissions are primarily made up of aircraft landing and take-off cycles (up to 1,000 metres elevation), and passenger, greeter/ fareweller and staff travel to and from the airport (surface access).This year we purchased offsets to cover the emissions associated with staff travel.

Several initiatives are underway as part of our commitment to working with our airport community to reduce Scope 3 emissions. These include:

  • Providing infrastructure at gates which offer an alternative to aircraft running their engines while parked at the gate. When aircraft plug in to the electricity supply at Sydney Airport instead of running their Auxiliary Power Units, there are air quality and health benefits, noise benefits, as well as emissions reductions. The introduction of the AOL, discussed in the

Responsible Business section of this report, is designed to increase the use of this equipment across the airport

  • Implementation of the A-CDM program next year is designed to create efficiencies across the airfield and in the airspace. When realised, these efficiencies will drive down emissions from the aircraft on the airfield and in the airspace
  • Investing in gates and infrastructure to support next generation aircraft

Economic contribution

Aviation is vitally important to the Australian economy. Sydney Airport makes a significant contribution by facilitating the generation of $38 billion in economic activity 11.

Sydney Airport is the largest airport in Australia, accounting for around

40 per cent of international passenger movements 12, 47 per cent of air freight, and 23 per cent of domestic passenger movements. It is identified as one of Sydney's two 13 nationally significant trade gateways and contributes 2.2 per cent of Australian Gross Domestic Product and 6.8 per cent of NSW Gross State Product 14. The sustainable growth of Sydney Airport will be

critical to achieving future local, state and national employment, tourism and development objectives.

It is estimated that, in aggregate, the activities of the Sydney Airport precinct generated or facilitated 338,500 jobs in 2017 11. Around 32,000 of these people come to work at Sydney Airport. More than half of these people live locally in the Bayside, Randwick City, Inner West, City of Sydney, Canterbury Bankstown, Georges River or Sutherland Shire local government areas.

During the year, the value of Sydney Airport's economic value contribution included:

  • $1,639.7 million of direct economic value generated in the form of revenue
  • $1,622.3 million of economic value distributed in the form of operating costs, payments to employees and government, payments to providers of capital and community investments

By supporting access to a worldwide transportation network, the airport is important for global businesses as it supports the achievement of economic productivity.

  1. Deloitte Access Economics, Economic contribution of Sydney Airport (April 2018)
  2. BITRE, International Airline Activity, June 2018
  3. The other being Port Botany which is located immediately to the east of the airport. See, Greater Sydney Commission, Greater Sydney Region Plan,
    A Metropolis of Three Cities (March 2018)
  4. Deloitte Access Economics, Economic Contribution of Sydney Airport, April 2018

50 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Profile

Helen, Johnny and Mariah Ahladiotis

With more than 32,000 people working across its precinct, Sydney Airport is a significant job creator for the local area.

Growing up across the Cooks River in the suburb of Kymeeah, Helen Ahladiotis and her family have shared a lifelong association with the airport.

Helen has worked in a range of roles at our Airport Services Centre for the past 13 years, but says her memories of the airport go back much further.

"My family grew up with planes in the backyard and I always loved the airport," she said.

Helen's three children, Johnny, Kosta and Mariah, have all had after school jobs at the airport over the years working in different retail stores and providing support in the terminals.

"The airport was great for after-school work for the kids because of the shifts and the fact we lived so close by."

After finishing Year 12, Johnny was able to use the connections he made through his after-school job to secure an apprenticeship with Honeywell at the airport, where he still works today. Mariah currently works part time at Heinemann, the airport's duty free store, where the hours work in perfectly around her university studies. Kosta now works outside the airport.

Helen's also a member of SYD Support, the airport's team of volunteers who provide support and assistance in and around the terminal during peak periods or disruptions.

"Living so close means it's easy for me to come in and provide a hand when things get really busy," Helen said. "Plus, I really love being able to help customers and to make sure they have a great experience at Sydney Airport."

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Performance

Data

The data selected and reported in the Sustainability Report allows stakeholders to assess Sydney Airport's non-financial performance in areas of material significance. The data covers the performance and activities over which Sydney Airport had operational control during all, or part of, the year ended 31 December 2019.

Environmental data sets (emissions, energy, waste, water, noise and environmental spills) are reported for 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019, in line with Sydney Airport's regulatory environmental reporting.

52 Sydney Airport|  SustainabilityReportort 20192019

General metrics

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Revenue ($ million)

1,639.7

1,584.7

1,483.3

1,364.6

1,228.9

Number of passengers (million)

44.4

44.4

43.3

41.9

39.7

Number of domestic passengers (million)

27.5

27.7

27.4

26.9

25.9

Number of international passengers (million)

16.9

16.7

16

14.9

13.7

Total number of aircraft movements

346,182

344,149

345,104

346,437

335,001

Total number of employees

508

487

441

418

379

Health and safety

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Injuries and injury rates

Injuries by type - Employees

Fatalities

0

0

0

0

0

Lost time 15

5

10

6

3

2 16

Medical treatment

9

8

10

12

6

Injuries by type - Service providers

Fatalities

0

0

0

0

0

Lost time

13

9

13

19

14

Medical treatment

12

16

41

47

29

Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) 17

Employees

5.4

9.6

6.0

3.3

2.4

Service providers 18

4.5

3.0

4.7

7.2 16

7.2 16

Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate (TRIFR) 19

Employees

15.0

17.3

16

17.6

9.6

Service providers

8.7

8.4

19.4

25.1 16

20.3 16

Other rates

Passenger Incident Rate 20

0.9

1.0

1.0

1.1

1.0

Hours worked

Employees

931,675

1,043,209

1,001,048

912,627

845,695

Service providers

2,882,777

2,961,796

2,788,259

2,631,284

2,120,579

Training hours and inspections

Safety training hours

1,891

2,762

-

-

-

Safety walks

840

-

-

-

-

Aviation safety hours

6,287

8,297

8,256

8,780

6,994

Wildlife strikes 21

2.3

1.2

1.9

1.8

1.5

  1. LTI is a work-related injury that results in at least one full day or shift being lost after the day on which the injury or illness occurred
  2. Result updated for accuracy based on a review of historical safety data
  3. Represents the number of LTIs per one million hours worked, incurred by employees, internal consultants and contractors
  4. Service providers (including cleaning, security, kerb side management, waste management, parking and trolleys and bussing) engaged by Sydney Airport.
  5. Represents the number of medical treatment injuries and LTIs per million hours worked
  6. Number of first aid and medical treatment injuries per 100,000 passengers
  7. Wildlife strikes per 10,000 aircraft movements

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Performance data

Environment (reported for period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019)

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Total emissions (tCO2e)

Total Scope 1 & 2 22

83,620

86,916

87,888

85,644

88,348

Scope 1

5,755

5,569

5,826

5,746

5,349

Scope 2

77,865

81,347

82,062

79,898

82,999

Scope 3

883,983

884,610

1,120,932

952,747

-

Emissions intensity

Intensity (kgCO2e/ PAX) 23

2.4

2.6

2.7

2.8

3.1

Carbon Offsetting (tCO2e)

Total offsets

784

295

295

295

430

Energy

Total energy consumption (GJ) 24

446,544

447,635

447,283

441,103

441,265

Stationary fuels

81,108

71,284

66,115

68,503

66,524

Transport fuels

18,067

22,577

29,472

30,179

27,302

Electricity (excl. Solar)

344,607

352,831

351,696

342,421

347,439

Solar

2,763

943 25

0

0

0

Water

Total water consumption (KL)

705,702

617,891

756,081

719,585

880,171

Potable water consumption

526,698

465,960

600,845

507,211

671,031

Ground water

863

1,263

3,964

2,757

2,513

Water recycled (and consumed)

178,141

150,668

151,272

209,617

206,627

Total water recycled (%)

25%

24%

20%

29%

23%

Total water recycled T1 (%)

30%

30%

-

-

-

Water intensity (L/PAX) 26

21

18

24

23

30

Environmental Spills

Number of large spills (>100m2)

4

4

1

4

3

Noise

Noise complaints and breaches

2

10

4

5

11

Number of Aircraft Engine Operating Procedure breaches

0

12

0

1

0

  1. GHG inventory is compiled using the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting and the National Greenhouse Accounts Factors' methodologies
  2. Calculated by dividing total Scope 1 and 2 emissions by the number of passengers. Offsets purchased for Scope 1 emission sources are deducted for intensity calculation purposes. Excludes T3
  3. Data for 2018 has been readjusted for compatibility with 2019
  4. Part year result only. Solar array installed in Q1 2018
  5. Calculated by dividing total water consumption emissions (L) by the number of passengers. Excludes T3

54 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Environment (reported for period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019)

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Air emissions (kg)

Carbon Monoxide (CO)

3,708

3,700

3,400

4,500

3,400

Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx)

6,670

6,700

5,600

10,000

5,200

Oxides of Sulphur (SOx)

34

34

32

33

32

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)

461

460

440

620

510

Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM)

831

840

730

1,110

680

Waste 27

Waste generated (tonnes)

6,360

6,489

6,438

5,740

5,324

Hazardous waste (quarantine)

1,772

1,704

1,486

1,330

1,268

Non-hazardous waste 28

4,588

4,785

4,952

4,410

4,056

Waste disposal (tonnes)

6,360

6,489

6,438

5,740

5,324

Recycling

1,990

2,052

2,101

1,799

1,687

Autoclaving and landfill

1,772

1,704

1,486

1,330

1,268

Landfill

2,598

2,733

2,851

2,611

2,369

Total waste recycled (%) 29

43.4%

42.9%

42.4%

31.3%

31.7%

Waste intensity (kg/PAX) 30

0.19

0.19

0.20

0.19

0.18

Customer

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Customer satisfaction (out of five)

International

4.21

4.13

4.01

3.89

3.83

Domestic

4.16

4.14

3.95

3.91

3.85

Ambience

International

4.28

4.22

4.17

3.99

3.91

Domestic

4.20

4.14

4.11

4.06

3.98

Cleanliness

International

4.31

4.27

4.24

4.13

4.07

Domestic

4.22

4.19

4.14

4.11

4.04

Wayfinding

International

4.19

4.12

3.97

3.82

3.85

Domestic

4.25

4.21

4.09

4.02

3.98

  1. Excludes waste generated on aircraft, T3, Qantas Premium Lounge, car parks and construction waste
  2. Includes non-quarantine solid and liquid wastes. Reported in 2018 as 'waste to landfill' and 'recycled waste'
  3. Excludes quarantine waste from 2017 onwards. This cannot be recycled due to quarantine restrictions and requirements
  4. Calculated by dividing total hazardous (quarantine) and non-hazardous (solid and liquid) in kilograms by the number of passengers. Excludes T3

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Performance data

People and organisation 31

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Total employees

508

487

441

418

379

Total Workforce by employment type

M

F

Permanent full time

300

170

435

387

373

348

Permanent part time

10

19

30

26

18

11

Fixed term full time

2

7

20

24

26

19

Fixed term part time

0

0

2

4

1

1

Casual

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Workforce by age

M

F

<30

26

20

106

103

96

83

30-50

197

142

297

261

246

224

>50

89

34

84

77

76

72

Total Workforce by category

M

F

Board

5

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CEO

1

0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Key management personnel 32

2

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other executive / General Manager 33

10

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Senior Manager

10

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other Manager

47

23

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Professional

142

110

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Technical and trade

96

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Administration and clerical

4

35

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Diversity

Diversity in the total workforce

Number of female employees

196

189

167

152

128

% women in the total workforce

39%

39%

38%

36%

34%

% of females in management roles

37%

35%

39%

37%

33%

Female representation by category 34

Board

29%

25%

29%

29%

29%

CEO

0%

0%

100%

100%

100%

Key management personnel

33%

30%

27%

33%

40%

Other executive/ General Manager

38%

Senior Manager

52%

45%

48%

41%

36%

Other Manager

33%

33%

37%

36%

33%

Professional

44%

46%

43%

42%

41%

Technical and trade

9%

3%

8%

8%

6%

Administration and clerical

90%

82%

92%

94%

91%

  1. Gender based reporting by category and age adopted in reporting from 2019 onwards
  2. These include Chief Financial Officer, Chief Commercial Officer and Chief Operating Officer
  3. These include Chief Assets and Infrastructure Officer and Chief Strategy Officer and General Managers
  4. Female representation by category for 2018 and prior have been adjusted to align with the new 2019 categories developed in line with Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) reporting requirements

56 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

People and organisation 31

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Pay equity 35

Gender pay equity ratio

95.9

93.4

92.2

94.5

96.9

Recruitment and retention

New hires

Total number of new hires

96

106

80

87

86

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

% of new hires by gender

55%

45%

57%

45%

50%

50%

53%

47%

51%

49%

Turnover rate

19%

14%

14%

12%

15%

Voluntary employee turnover rate

12%

10%

12%

8%

12%

Involuntary employee turnover rate

7%

4%

2%

4%

3%

Turnover rate by age and gender (%)

M

F

<30

1%

1%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30-50

6%

7%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

>50

2%

2%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Collective bargaining agreements

% of employees in collective bargaining agreements

36%

40%

-

-

-

Internal movement and opportunities

% internal recruitment

31%

48%

34%

39%

42%

% of employees promoted

15%

-

-

-

-

Training

Average training hours and spend

M

F

Total average hours of training a per employee

15.5

14.1

10.0

11.9

9.3

Average hours of training per employee by gender

15.6

15.3

-

-

-

-

Average amount spent per employee on training (AU$)

1,157

1,289

659

-

-

Community investment

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

Community investment

Total community investment (AU$ million) 36

5.2

5.7

5.0

3.3

2.6

Employee participation

Volunteer hours

185

202

163

252

-

% of employees participating in payroll giving

3%

3%

3%

4%

2%

  1. Calculated on base salary and superannuation
  2. Calculated and verified in accordance with the London Benchmarking Group (LBG) Australia and New Zealand framework. See the community investment section of this report for a breakdown of contributions

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Other Information

58 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

GRI Index

GRI Standards

Disclosure

Publication

Disclosure

Number

Year

Title

Sydney Airport disclosure/ reference

General Disclosures

102-1

2016

Name of the organisation

Sydney Airport Limited

102-2

2016

Activities, brands, products, and services

SYD manages landside and airside operations of the Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport.

SYD's services and operations are segmented into four business units:

1. Aeronautical services: responsible for all aspects of the business associated with

aviation operations, activity and revenue, security, safety, sustainability and environment.

2. Retail: responsible for the retail, food and dining portfolio across SYD, including

leasing, marketing, brand space and advertising.

3. Property, car rental and hotels: responsible for the development, leasing and day

to day management of SYD commercial assets located within terminals, the airfield,

landside areas and hotels.

4. Landside operations and transport: responsible for all of SYD's landside ground

transport operations including car parking and commercial transport operators

including buses, taxis, hire cars and rideshare.

102-3

2016

Location of headquarters

Nigel Love Building, 10 Arrivals Court, Mascot, NSW, Australia

102-4

2016

Location of operations

Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport, Mascot, NSW, Australia

102-5

2016

Ownership and legal form

Sydney Airport Limited is the ultimate 100% parent company of Sydney Airport

Corporation Limited, the operator of Sydney (Kingsford Smith) Airport.

102-6

2016

Markets served

All of SYD's operations and services take place at Kingsford Smith Airport. Our key

customers are the 44.4 million passengers moving through our terminals and the

airlines flying to and from our airport. See 2019 Annual Report - Highlights for a

breakdown of the regional breakdown of passengers.

102-7

2016

Scale of the organization

Total employees: 508

Detailed information on number of operations, quantity of services and financial scale

of our business can be found in our 2019 Annual Report - Highlights

102-8

2016

Information on employees

All our workforce is employed in Australia.

and other workers

2019 Sustainability Report - Performance data > People and organisation.

102-9

2016

Supply chain

SYD's major suppliers include those that support the airport's infrastructure

development, deliver services to and support maintenance of airport facilities. In 2019,

SYD's main supplier categories by spend related to construction services, security

services, facilities and asset maintenance services, civil & asphalt works and utilities

(electricity, gas and water).

102-10

2016

Significant changes to the organisation

Sydney Airport took over full management of T3 in 2019. Sydney Airport purchased

and its supply chain

T3 from Qantas in September 2015, four years ahead of the existing lease's expiration

date. The transition to Sydney Airport control was managed over two periods during the

year to ensure a smooth transition with minimal passenger disruption. This culminated

in Sydney Airport taking control of terminal operations, operational maintenance of

the baggage handling system and security, access control, CCTV and checked bag

screening in October For environment data, this change will be reflected in 2020

reporting given the current June-July reporting period.

102-11

2016

Precautionary Principle or approach

The precautionary principle is reflected in Sydney Airport's approach to risk

management. Refer to the risk disclosure in the 2019 Annual Report for

further information

102-12

2016

External initiatives

2019 Sustainability Report - Benchmark and ratings performance

102-13

2016

Membership of associations

Current main memberships

Botany Bay Business Enterprise Centre

across the company:

Business Council of Australia

Airport Councils International

Business Events Sydney

ANZ Airports ICT Forum

CAPA - Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation

ANZLF Forum 2018 (Australia-

CEDA - Committee for the Economic

New Zealand Leadership Forum 2018)

Development of Australia

Asia Pacific Travel Retail Association

Committee for Sydney

Asia Society

Diversity Council of Australia (DCA)

Australasian Investor Relations

Financial Executives Institute (FEI)

Association (AIRA)

Green Building Council of Australia

Australia Arab Chamber of Commerce

Infrastructure Partnerships Australia

Australia China Business Council

LBG Corporate Citizenship (VCCP)

Australia Indonesia Association

NSW Business Chamber (Sydney & Metro

Australia Indonesia Business Council Ltd

Business Forum)

Australia-Israel Chamber of Commerce

NSW Business Chamber (Sydney First)

Australia Tourism Export Council (ATEC)

Outdoor Media Association

Australian Airports Association

Parking Australia

Australian Chamber of Commerce and

Property Council of Australia

Industry (ACCI)

(NSW Company Membership)

Australian Logistics Council

Regional Aviation Association of

Australia (RAAA)

Sydney Roundtable strategic partnership

Tourism and Transport Forum

Australia (TTF)

Strategy

102-14

2016

Statement from senior decision-maker

2019 Sustainability Report - Chair and CEO message

102-15

2016

Key impacts, risks, and opportunities

2019 Annual Report - Risk management

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GRI Index

GRI Standards

Disclosure

Publication

Disclosure

Number

Year

Title

Sydney Airport disclosure/ reference

Ethics and integrity

102-16

2016

Values, principles, standards, and

Purpose statement - 'Making Sydney proud every day'.

norms of behaviour

Sydney Airport website - Vision and values

2019

Corporate Governance Statement - Principle 3

102-17

2016

Mechanisms for advice and

Sydney Airport Code of Conduct and Whistleblower Policy

concerns about ethics

2019

Sustainability Report - Fair and ethical business

Governance

102-18

2016

Governance structure

2019

Annual Report - Directors' Report

2019

Corporate Governance Statement - Principle 2

102-22

2016

Composition of the highest governance

2019

Annual Report - Directors' Report

body and its committees

2019

Corporate Governance Statement - Principle 2

102-23

2016

Chair of the highest governance body

Mr Trevor Gerber, Chairman

2019

Annual Report - Directors' Report

102-30

2016

Effectiveness of risk

2019

Corporate Governance Statement - Principle 7

management processes

Stakeholder engagement

102-40

2016

List of stakeholder groups

2019

Sustainability Report - Stakeholder engagement

102-41

2016

Collective bargaining agreements

36% of our workforce was covered by an enterprise agreement at the end of the reporting

period. 2019 Sustainability Report - Performance data > People and organisation

102-42

2016

Identifying and selecting stakeholders

2019

Sustainability Report - Stakeholder engagement

2039 Sydney Airport Master Plan - Stakeholder and community engagement

102-43

2016

Approach to stakeholder engagement

2020 Sustainability Report - Stakeholder engagement

2039 Sydney Airport Master Plan - Stakeholder and community engagement

102-44

2016

Key topics and concerns raised

2019

Sustainability Report - Stakeholder engagement

102-45

2016

Entities included in the consolidated

2019

Annual Report - Directors' Report

financial statements

Reporting practice

102-46

2016

Defining report content and

2019

Sustainability Report - About this report

topic boundaries

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

102-47

2016

List of material topics

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

102-48

2016

Restatements of information

Where applicable, changes and restatements are indicated as footnotes in the

Sustainability performance data section of the 2019 Sustainability Report

102-49

2016

Changes in reporting

In 2019 we reviewed and updated our material issues. See the material issues section of

this report for more information

102-50

2016

Reporting period

1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019, with the exception of environmental datasets

which are reported for 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019, in line with Sydney Airport's external

environmental reporting

102-51

2016

Date of most recent report

2018

Sustainability Report, published in February 2019

102-52

2016

Reporting cycle

Annual

102-53

2016

Contact point for questions

We welcome feedback on our sustainability reporting and performance. Please email us

regarding the report

at sustainability@syd.com.au

102-54

2016

Claims of reporting in accordance with

2019

Sustainability Report - Benchmark and ratings performance

the GRI Standards

102-55

2016

GRI content index

2019

Sustainability Report - GRI index

102-56

2016

External assurance

2019

Sustainability Report - Limited assurance statement

Material topics

Safety

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Safety

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Safety

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

403-9

2018

Work-related injuries

2019

Sustainability Report - Safety

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Health and safety

Security, including cyber security

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Security

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Security

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Own indicator

Cyber security maturity rating

2019

Sustainability Report - Security

60 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

GRI Standards

Disclosure

Publication

Disclosure

Number

Year

Title

Sydney Airport disclosure/ reference

Environmental management

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Environmental management

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Environmental management

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Energy

302-1/3

2016

Energy consumption within the

2019 Sustainability Report - Environmental management

organisation and energy intensity

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Environment

Water and effluents

303-5

2018

Water consumption

2019 Sustainability Report - Environmental management

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Environment

Biodiversity

304-3

2016

Habitats protected or restored

2019

Sustainability Report - Environmental management

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Environment

Effluents and waste

306-3

2016

Significant spills

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Environment

Employee attraction, retention and development

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Our people

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Employee attraction, retention and development

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Employment

401-1

2016

New employee hires and employee

2019 Sustainability Report - Our people

turnover

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > People and organisation

Training and education

404-1

2016

Average hours of training per

2019

Sustainability Report - Our people

year per employee

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > People and organisation

Diversity and inclusion

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Our people

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Employee attraction, retention and development

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

405-1

2016

Diversity of governance

2019

Sustainability Report - Our people

bodies and employees

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > People and organisation

Fair and ethical business practices

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Fair and ethical business

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Fair and ethical business

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Procurement practices

Own indicator

Suppliers against the expectations set out

2019

Sustainability Report - Fair and ethical business

in the Supplier Code of Conduct

Public policy

415-1

2016

Political contributions

$36,045 was paid to attend political events and conferences during the reporting period

Climate change

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Climate resilience

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Climate resilience

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Economic performance

201-2

2016

Financial implications and other risks and

2019

Annual Report - Risk management - Climate resilience and adaptation

opportunities due to climate change

Emissions

305-1/2/3/4

2016

Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions; Energy

2019

Sustainability Report - Environmental management; Scope 3 emissions reduction

indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions; Other

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Environment

indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions; GHG

2019

Sustainability Report - Climate resilience

emissions intensity

sydneyairport.com.au

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

61

GRI Index

GRI Standards

Disclosure

Publication

Disclosure

Number

Year

Title

Sydney Airport disclosure/ reference

Sustainable development of the airport

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Sustainable development of the airport

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Sustainable development of the airport

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Operational efficiency and business continuity

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material Issues

boundary. The management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Operational efficiency and continuous improvement

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Operational efficiency and continuous improvement; Business

management approach

continuity and performance

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Own indicator

Explore opportunities to further improve

2019

Sustainability Report - Operational efficiency and continuous improvement

efficiencies through initiatives such

as co-location of certain domestic

and international activities and

runway rebalancing

Customer experience

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Customer experience

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Customer experience

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Own indicator

Customer satisfaction

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Customer

Own indicator

Passenger incident rate

2019

Sustainability Report - Performance data > Health and safety

Access to and from the airport

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Access to and from the airport

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Access to and from the airport

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Own indicator

Support diversity of public

2019

Sustainability Report - Access to and from the airport

transport modal options

Indirect economic impacts

203-1

2016

Infrastructure investments and

2019

Sustainability Report - Access to and from the airport

services supported

Innovation and technology

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Innovation and technology

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Innovation and technology

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Community investment and engagement

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Community investment; Community engagement

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Community investment and engagement

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Own indicator

2016

Community investment

2019 Sustainability Report - Performance data > Community

Own indicator

2016

Noise management including aircraft noise 2019

Sustainability Report - Aircraft noise

Economic performance

103-1/2/3

2016

Explanation of the material topic and its

2019

Sustainability Report - Material issues

boundary. The management approach

2019 Sustainability Report - Economic performance

and its components. Evaluation of the

Sydney Airport website - Economic performance

management approach

2019

Sustainability Report - Our approach to sustainability

Economic value

201-1

2016

Direct economic value generated

2019

Sustainability Report - Economic performance

and distributed

201-3

2016

Defined benefit plan obligations and other

2019

Annual Report - Employee benefits - Superannuation plans

retirement plans

62 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

Glossary

AAA

Australian Airports Association

IPCC

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

ACA

Airport Carbon Accreditation

ISMS

Information Security Management System

A-CDM

Airport Collaborative Decision Making

JUHI

Joint User Hydrant Installation

Responsible

ACI

Airports Council International

LBG

London Benchmarking Group

ACSI

Australian Council of Superannuation Investors

LTIFR

Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate

ADF

Australian Defence Force

LTOP

Long-Term Operating Plan

business

AFP

Australian Federal Police

MDP

Major Development Plan

AIM

Australian Institute of Management

MSCI

Morgan Stanley Capital International

AOL

Airport Operators Licence

NAIDOC

National Aborigines and Islanders Day

Observance Committee

APU

Auxiliary Power Unit

PCA

Pre-Conditioned Air

ASX

Australian Securities Exchange

PPA

Power Purchase Agreement

Planning

CASA

Civil Aviation Safety Authority

RAP

Reconciliation Action Plan

BHS

Baggage Handling System

PFAS

Polyfluoroalkyl substance

for

DJSI

Dow Jones Sustainability Index

RCP

Representation Concentration Pathways

the

EIS

Environmental Impact Statement

RMS

Road and Maritime Services

future

ESG

Environment, Social and Governance

SDG

United Nations Sustainable Development Goal

EV

Electric vehicle

SLL

Sustainability Linked Loan

FOD

Foreign Object Debris

SSS

Safety, Security and Sustainability Committee

FTSE

Financial Times Stock Exchange

SRI

Socially Responsible Investment

GPU

Ground Power Unit

T1

International Terminal

GRI

Global Reporting Initiative

T2 & T3

Domestic terminals

Supporting

GRESB

Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark

TCFD

Taskforce on Climate-related

Financial Disclosures

HLC

High Level Control

ULD

Unit Load Device

our

IAP

Incident Action Plan

UNGC

United Nations Global Compact

community

IATA

International Air Transport Association

UNSW

University of New South Wales

data Performance

information Other

sydneyairport.com.au 63

Limited assurance statement

Independent Limited Assurance Report to the Directors of Sydney Airport Limited

Conclusion

Based on the procedures performed, and the evidence obtained, we are not aware of any material misstatements in the Selected Sustainability Information, which have been prepared by Sydney Airport Limited in accordance with the criteria as defined and described by management in the Sustainability Report for the year ended 31 December 2019.

Information subject to assurance

The Selected Sustainability Information, as presented in Sydney Airport Limited's ("SYD") Sustainability Report 2019 and available on SYD's website, comprised the following:

Selected Sustainability Information

Value assured

Total Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions for the period 1 July

83,620

2018 to 30 June 2019 (CO2e)*

Passenger satisfaction score 2019 - International

4.21

Passenger satisfaction score 2019 - Domestic T2/T3 (in aggregate)

4.16

Female representation overall (%)

39

Waste to landfill (tonnes) for the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019*

2,598

Recycled waste (tonnes) for the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019*

1,990

Quarantine waste (tonnes) for the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019*

1,772

Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) for SYD employees

5.4

Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate (TRIFR) for SYD employees

15.0

* Excludes T3, refer to footnotes in Performance Data section

Criteria used as the basis of reporting

The criteria used in relation to the Sustainability Report content are SYD's policies, procedures and methodologies as disclosed in the 2019 Sustainability Report.

Basis for conclusion

We conducted our work in accordance with Australian Standard on Assurance Engagements ASAE 3000 (Standard). In accordance with the Standard we have:

  • used our professional judgement to plan and perform the engagement to obtain limited assurance that we are not aware of any material misstatements in the selected sustainability information, whether due to fraud or error;
  • considered relevant internal controls when designing our assurance procedures, however we do not express a conclusion on their effectiveness; and

64 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

  • ensured that the engagement team possess the appropriate knowledge, skills and professional competencies.

Summary of procedures performed

Our limited assurance conclusion is based on the evidence obtained from performing the following procedures:

  • enquiries with relevant SYD personnel, and review of selected documentation;
  • enquiries with relevant SYD personnel to understand the internal controls, governance structure and reporting process of the Selected Sustainability Information;
  • reviews of corporate documents concerning sustainability strategy and policies for material issues, and the implementation of these across the business;
  • interviews with relevant staff at corporate level and service organisations engaged by Sydney Airport responsible for providing the information in the Sustainability Report;
  • analytical procedures over the Selected Sustainability Information;
  • agreement of a sample of Selected Sustainability Information to source documentation;
  • evaluating the appropriateness of the criteria with respect to the Selected Sustainability Information; and
  • reviewed the Sustainability Report in its entirety to ensure it is consistent with our overall knowledge based on the work undertaken during our limited assurance engagement.

How the Standard defines limited assurance and material misstatement

The procedures performed in a limited assurance engagement vary in nature and timing from, and are less in extent than for a reasonable assurance engagement. Consequently the level of assurance obtained in a limited assurance engagement is substantially lower than the assurance that would have been obtained had a reasonable assurance engagement been performed.

Misstatements, including omissions, are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence relevant decisions of the intended users taken on the basis of the Sustainability Report or the Selected Sustainability Information.

Use of this Assurance Report

This report has been prepared for the Directors of Sydney Airport Limited for the purpose of providing an assurance conclusion on the Sustainability Report and the Selected Sustainability Information and may not be suitable for another purpose. We disclaim any assumption of responsibility for any reliance on this report, to any person other than the Directors of Sydney Airport Limited, or for any other purpose than that for which it was prepared.

© 2020 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative ("KPMG International"), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.

sydneyairport.com.au

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

65

Limited assurance statement

Directors' responsibility

The Directors are responsible for:

  • determining that the criteria is appropriate to meet their needs;
  • preparing and presenting the Sustainability Report and the Selected Sustainability Information in accordance with the criteria; and
  • establishing internal controls that enable the preparation and presentation of the Sustainability Report and the Selected Sustainability Information that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; and maintaining integrity of the website.

KPMG

Sydney

19 February 2020

Our responsibility

Our responsibility is to perform a limited assurance engagement in relation to the Sustainability Report and Selected Sustainability Information for the period 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019, and to issue an assurance report that includes our conclusion.

Our independence and quality control

We have complied with our independence and other relevant ethical requirements of the Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants issued by the Australian Professional and Ethical Standards Board, and complied with the applicable requirements of Australian Standard on Quality Control 1 to maintain a comprehensive system of quality control.

© 2020 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative ("KPMG International"), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.

66 Sydney Airport  | Sustainability Report 2019

Photo credits

Page

Photo

Credit

Front cover

Cover image

Getty Images

01

Contents page

Getty Images

03

Trevor Gerber and Geoff Culbert

Armstrong Q

04-05

Aircraft image

Nils Nedel, via Unsplash

07

Banner image

Raj Eiamworakul, via Unsplash

11

Banner image

Tim Patch, via Unsplash

12

T1 Arrivals Meeting Point

Kurt Ams

14-15

Sydney Opera House

Simon Rae, via Unsplash

17

Sydney Airport staff at the Airport Safety Week FOD Walk

Kurt Ams

18

Ground handling staff working on the Sydney Airport airfield

Kurt Ams

21

T1 Departures wall

Kurt Ams

23

Sydney Airport wetlands

Kurt Ams

24

Sydney Airport environment team members Jake Atkins and

Kurt Ams

Philippa Scott planting in the Sydney Airport wetlands

25

T2 Lifestyle Precinct

-

27

Sydney Airport Work Health Safety Manager Rob Cracknell

Kurt Ams

27

Sydney Airport Project Manager Tim Greenway

-

28-29

Sydney Airport Departures wall

Kurt Ams

29

Anti-Slavery Australia Professor Jill McKeough, AFP Assistant

-

Commissioner Debbie Platz and Sydney Airport General

Manager Operations Matt Duffy

30-31

Background image

Bethany Legg, via Unsplash

32-33

Aircalin at Sydney Airport

Kurt Ams

34-35

Sydney Airport aerial

-

36-37

Airfield image from Sydney Airport 100 year gala dinner

Luke Latty

39

Regionally significant swamp hibiscus (Hibiscus diversifolius) at

Kurt Ams

the Sydney Airport wetlands

39

Banner image

Seth Doyle, via Unsplash

40

Assistance animal facilities at Sydney Airport

Kurt Ams

41

Jack Tyrrell using the Aira service at Sydney Airport

Larnce Gold

43

T2 Lifestyle Precinct

-

44-45

Surf Life Saving Sydney nippers

Renee Nowytarger

45

Sydney Airport Community Panel meeting

-

46

Surf Life Saving Sydney President Peter Agnew

Kurt Ams

47

Surf Life Saving Sydney nippers at Bondi Beach

Luke Latty

48

Gamay dancers at Sydney Airport 100 year gala dinner

Luke Latty

49

Airport Ambassador Program Manager Michelle Minogue and

Kurt Ams

airport ambassadors

49

Aircraft image

James Lusher

50

Sydney Airport airfield

Luke Latty

51

Helen, Johnny and Mariah Ahladiotis

Seth Jaworski

52

Sydney skyline

Getty Images

55

Banner image

Shifaaz Shamoon, via Unsplash

57

Banner image

Kekai Ahsham, via Unsplash

58

Sydney Airport airfield

Kurt Ams

61

Banner image

Jenn Evelyn Ann, via Unsplash

65

Banner image

Nigel Coghlan

sydneyairport.com.au

Airport Sydney at Sustainability

business Responsible

future the for Planning

community our Supporting

data Performance

information Other

67

Disclaimer

Sydney Airport Holdings Limited published this content on 20 February 2020 and is solely responsible for the information contained therein. Distributed by Public, unedited and unaltered, on 19 February 2020 23:46:11 UTC

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